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Songs that have surprising deeper/darker subjects.


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55 minutes ago, Jasper said:

We were taught at school that Greensleeves was written by Henry Vlll for Anne Boleyn.

we thought it was about coming to school with a snotty nose and no hankie 

did the bloke who invented the phrase "one hit wonder" invent anything else?

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1 hour ago, Johnoco said:

Itchycoo Park is allegedly a reference to people stinging their ass on nettles while, er, getting up to no good in a certain park. 

Macarthur Park is a reference...

no got nothing, something about cakes and rain. I have no clue what it's all about.

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  • 5 weeks later...

devil woman by marty robbins- may not have such a dark side but you cant help thinking how he takes no blame or responsibility whatsoever for the affair that almost ruined his relationship with the woman (mary) on who he was no doubt cheating on - not a single bit of blame on his part- all the fault of the "devil woman" 

did the bloke who invented the phrase "one hit wonder" invent anything else?

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On 25/03/2021 at 20:25, Old Frightful said:

Moonlight Shadow is apparently about the assassination of John Lennon.

Mark Chapman has got his life back together and is a reformed character. If he was asked about the shooting of Lennon at HT at a RL game on the BBC he wouldn’t want to talk about it. He has moved on. 

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Most madrigals of the Tudor and early Stuart era can be described as being either sad, quite intense, expressions of unrequited love, or being very lively with pastoral imagery often used for erotic, descriptive purposes.

A notable exception is The Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons, which is based on the old belief that swans make no noise until they know their death is imminent, when they sing once beautifully and then die (hence the phrase 'swan song')  This is, of course, ornithological nonsense.  Our permanently resident mute swan species often makes a sort of grunting sound.  The two regularly recurring, migratory swans which arrive here in winter - Bewick and whooper - have a honking call, not dissimilar to some geese.

It is not known who wrote the text of the Gibbons' madrigal.  It concludes "More geese than swans now live, more fools than wise" and this has prompted speculation that it might have been the imprisoned Walter Raleigh, who had fallen out of favour at court when James VI and I succeeded Elizabeth.  The implication is that loose tongues stitched him up; he was executed in 1618, six years after the madrigal appeared in a printed collection.

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