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Foods winter favourites


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Well it's getting chilly and time for proper winter warmers. I like to dabble in the kitchen.

Cottage pie, roasts are all good.

A family favourite is cheese and potato pie. Basically cheesy mash baked in the oven in a pie dish. My old dear used to make hers with onion.

Her favourite which I hate is coddle. Basically bacon and potato stew 

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Autumn and Winter food should be brown, comforting, rich and filling.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Stews, casseroles, curries, pies, the lot.

Red meat, game meat, mushrooms, chestnuts, roasted meat and vegetables, mountains of mashed potato and lakes of gravy.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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7 minutes ago, Midlands hobo said:

Any particular recipe? I'm looking for something new.

Here's something I've done a few times before (massively cutting down the website's quantities) and always enjoyed. The bonus is that the preparation work involves a bit of measuring and stirring at the start, then there's nothing to do until slicing some spring onions just before serving and that's it (plus whatever you choose to serve it with, of course). The recipe doesn't even recommend searing the beef first, but you can if you like. I prefer to, unless I'm feeling really lazy.

The recipe calls for Sriracha, but the relative quantity (a tablespoon for three pounds of meat) is so small, it doesn't make it a spicy dish. You can make it spicier, and the flavour combination will still work unless you get really silly.

All the ingredients are available in mainstream supermarkets, and if you don't have a slow cooker, just set the oven to about 150/160° celsius and cook in a covered pot, stirring occasionally.

https://damndelicious.net/2015/02/21/slow-cooker-korean-beef/ 

As always with this sort of dish, it's a good idea to make double what you need, refrigerate/freeze the uneaten half and have it re-heated and even tastier some time later.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Hard to beat nice stews and soups in winter and the likes of shepherds pie.

My nan and grandad always used to make some lovely stews and broths and I always regret not getting the recipes when I could. I know they were probably simple but I've never had anything close to them since they passed on.

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Just now, Damien said:

Hard to beat nice stews and soups in winter and the likes of shepherds pie.

My nan and grandad always used to make some lovely stews and broths and I always regret not getting the recipes when I could. I know they were probably simple but I've never had anything close to them since they passed on.

Luckily, both branches of my family were scrap-bookers when it came to recipes. Not just family hand-me-down recipes, but also clippings from magazines and colour supplements of anything that caught their eye. Which is why we often celebrate Christmas Eve with a Russian mushroom and pasta dish that my dad spotted about 40 years ago in the Sunday Times.

The only problem with this is when we have two excellent but different recipes for the same dish and have to choose between ancestors.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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My mam used to serve baked suet with stews , soaking up that delicious gravy. Never come across baked suet anywhere else , mam would add butter to the mix to give a crunchy outer and really moist innards , tried her recipe , nothing comes close which could be the make up of suet in modern times.

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6 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Luckily, both branches of my family were scrap-bookers when it came to recipes. Not just family hand-me-down recipes, but also clippings from magazines and colour supplements of anything that caught their eye. Which is why we often celebrate Christmas Eve with a Russian mushroom and pasta dish that my dad spotted about 40 years ago in the Sunday Times.

The only problem with this is when we have two excellent but different recipes for the same dish and have to choose between ancestors.

One thing I always remember how they used cheaper cuts of meat that provided much more flavour than more expensive cuts. Pretty hard to know now what and these days it's stuff you need to go to a butchers to get.

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1 minute ago, Stirlin said:

My mam used to serve baked suet with stews , soaking up that delicious gravy. Never come across baked suet anywhere else , mam would add butter to the mix to give a crunchy outer and really moist innards , tried her recipe , nothing comes close which could be the make up of suet in modern times.

When you say baked suet, do you mean a savoury pudding? Not just heated-up kidney fat.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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1 minute ago, Damien said:

One thing I always remember how they used cheaper cuts of meat that provided much more flavour than more expensive cuts. Pretty hard to know now what and these days it's stuff you need to go to a butchers to get.

If you don't have a proper local butchers, Morrison's are the best for the less well-known, cheaper cuts like ox cheek or Denver steak. They even do pig trotters!

There's always a chance that other thrifty shoppers have emptied that part of the shelves. Luckily, they also do home delivery via Amazon.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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1 hour ago, Stirlin said:

Just mams dumpling mix , with the aforementioned butter in a large yorky pud tin cut into individual portions.

I haven't come across that, but there's a recipe for onion suet pudding that looks like a very comforting side for roasts or stews.

https://www.bigoven.com/recipe/onion-pudding-english/117799 

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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On 19/11/2023 at 19:55, DavidM said:

Tatie hash . All boxes ticked . Similar variation on a theme in many areas 

My Mother made a version of what she called Tatie Ash. It was lamb based and I wasn't that keen.

Now I would love to try it again. The problem is that the recipes I have come across are more like corned beef g

hash.

What is your recipe?

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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1 hour ago, Bearman said:

My Mother made a version of what she called Tatie Ash. It was lamb based and I wasn't that keen.

Now I would love to try it again. The problem is that the recipes I have come across are more like corned beef g

hash.

What is your recipe?

Yeh that’s pretty much my recipe to 

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6 hours ago, Bearman said:

My Mother made a version of what she called Tatie Ash. It was lamb based and I wasn't that keen.

Now I would love to try it again. The problem is that the recipes I have come across are more like corned beef g

hash.

What is your recipe?

Can you describe it what you remember about the dish? Was it crispy or soft? Was the lamb minced or diced? Et cetera.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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17 hours ago, Futtocks said:

Can you describe it what you remember about the dish? Was it crispy or soft? Was the lamb minced or diced? Et cetera.

I suspect Derwent may be on the mark.

It was akin to Lancashire Hotpot. Lamb ( probably scrag) soft potatoes, onions

In fact that us probably about it.

 

15 hours ago, Derwent said:

Get a Cumberland tatie pot knocked into you, with pickled red cabbage on the side. Traditionally lamb based but shin of beef or pork shoulder works just as well.

That could be right. Have you a recipe?

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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6 minutes ago, Bearman said:

 

That could be right. Have you a recipe?

For Tatie Pot - Basically you chop up carrots, swede and onion and throw it into a casserole dish with whichever meat you want to use. Then crumble up some black pudding into it which adds seasoning and texture to the gravy. Add water and gravy granules and cook on 160 degrees for about 3 hours. Then cover it in thinly sliced potatoes and put back in the oven for an hour at 180 degrees until the potatoes start to crisp.

Tatie Hash is a different thing and looks like this....

 

 

 

1_O3ewmDbCo7oKtVWsa4vIrg.jpg

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I’m not prejudiced, I hate everybody equally

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55 minutes ago, Derwent said:

For Tatie Pot - Basically you chop up carrots, swede and onion and throw it into a casserole dish with whichever meat you want to use. Then crumble up some black pudding into it which adds seasoning and texture to the gravy. Add water and gravy granules and cook on 160 degrees for about 3 hours. Then cover it in thinly sliced potatoes and put back in the oven for an hour at 180 degrees until the potatoes start to crisp.

Tatie Hash is a different thing and looks like this....

 

 

 

1_O3ewmDbCo7oKtVWsa4vIrg.jpg

Thanks Derwent.

I will try the Tatie Pot and the Tatie Ash looks about right too.

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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6 hours ago, Derwent said:

For Tatie Pot - Basically you chop up carrots, swede and onion and throw it into a casserole dish with whichever meat you want to use. Then crumble up some black pudding into it which adds seasoning and texture to the gravy. Add water and gravy granules and cook on 160 degrees for about 3 hours. Then cover it in thinly sliced potatoes and put back in the oven for an hour at 180 degrees until the potatoes start to crisp.

Tatie Hash is a different thing and looks like this....

 

 

 

1_O3ewmDbCo7oKtVWsa4vIrg.jpg

Thanks for that D , I will give that tatie pot a go , have some stuffing with it as its the time of year.

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