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4 hours ago, unapologetic pedant said:

I suspect part of the appeal of Tag to those principally interested in health and fitness is that burning calories in a collective setting is easier than sticking to an individual regime. Nonetheless, they are playing a non-contact form of RL. It would be remiss not to try to foster a connection to the Tackle game. But it needs to grow organically. I haven`t seen any suggestions the RFL should be trying to sell stuff to Tag players.

I think it will only happen significantly if the community clubs establish League Tag and players choose to migrate back and forth between that and their OzTag franchise. In NSW, Tag players want to be part of and represent a junior RL club.

If UK Tag players prefer to be separate, it might be an idea to find out why. If they feel the "big social side to Tag" doesn`t naturally fit with a community RL club, it could indicate ways the clubs could usefully change.

From a non-heartlands perspective, it's likely to be a travel issue. If you can run a tag league in one location and get 4 or 5 teams there, you have a competition with zero travel. If you just added a tag team to each community club, you would have some clubs with loads of travel.

I've been a big believer in social formats of the game - not necessarily to recruit players, but as a way of engaging club members and finding volunteers etc. I think the model of a community club hosting a tag league is a really good one - not that the players represent your club, but that the club is the home base for them. 

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Every point you blokes make are legitimate reasons why this version of the sport should be considered part of the Rugby League family.  Like it or not RL is a physically demanding sport where not

Somebody on these pages recently referred to " both the contact and the non-contact versions of Rugby League". For the sake of the game TTRL must be claimed under the Rugby League banner world wide. T

From a non-heartlands perspective, it's likely to be a travel issue. If you can run a tag league in one location and get 4 or 5 teams there, you have a competition with zero travel. If you just added

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3 minutes ago, zylya said:

From a non-heartlands perspective, it's likely to be a travel issue. If you can run a tag league in one location and get 4 or 5 teams there, you have a competition with zero travel. If you just added a tag team to each community club, you would have some clubs with loads of travel.

I've been a big believer in social formats of the game - not necessarily to recruit players, but as a way of engaging club members and finding volunteers etc. I think the model of a community club hosting a tag league is a really good one - not that the players represent your club, but that the club is the home base for them. 

My understanding is that there are more OzTag players in London than any other area. There might not be an abundance of RL clubs in the capital, but enough to make a League Tag competition viable, if they can forge the links.

What you`re describing above is similar to the multiple-team KiwiTag modules that a number of Auckland RL clubs run during their off-season. They have taken it a step further though, with players selected from their module representing the club at a gala event.

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4 minutes ago, unapologetic pedant said:

My understanding is that there are more OzTag players in London than any other area. There might not be an abundance of RL clubs in the capital, but enough to make a League Tag competition viable, if they can forge the links.

What you`re describing above is similar to the multiple-team KiwiTag modules that a number of Auckland RL clubs run during their off-season. They have taken it a step further though, with players selected from their module representing the club at a gala event.

I was thinking of areas like Coventry and Bristol (plus other new areas that might use tag to grow the sport) where there are fewer community clubs than London.

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2 minutes ago, zylya said:

I was thinking of areas like Coventry and Bristol (plus other new areas that might use tag to grow the sport) where there are fewer community clubs than London.

If the RFL get League Tag well-established in heartland areas, it would create something other areas could link with. Maybe not regularly, due to the travel costs you cited, but for occasional rep games and the kind of special events like the one I mentioned in Auckland.

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7 hours ago, zylya said:

From a non-heartlands perspective, it's likely to be a travel issue. If you can run a tag league in one location and get 4 or 5 teams there, you have a competition with zero travel. If you just added a tag team to each community club, you would have some clubs with loads of travel.

I've been a big believer in social formats of the game - not necessarily to recruit players, but as a way of engaging club members and finding volunteers etc. I think the model of a community club hosting a tag league is a really good one - not that the players represent your club, but that the club is the home base for them. 

I think community clubs running tag leagues could work well. It would bring in lots of people on a midweek evening and also raises awareness of the club in the local community. It might even attract a few volunteers or players to the full contact side of the club as a result.

It could also be taken a step further where each club who runs a Tag league in the same town/city/district could then select a rep side from the players to compete in a 1 day tournament against the other clubs.

Another idea could be to run a play off between the winners of each league at the different clubs

 

Edited by JM2010
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13 hours ago, zylya said:

From a non-heartlands perspective, it's likely to be a travel issue. If you can run a tag league in one location and get 4 or 5 teams there, you have a competition with zero travel. If you just added a tag team to each community club, you would have some clubs with loads of travel.

 

6 hours ago, JM2010 said:

I think community clubs running tag leagues could work well. It would bring in lots of people on a midweek evening and also raises awareness of the club in the local community. It might even attract a few volunteers or players to the full contact side of the club as a result.

It could also be taken a step further where each club who runs a Tag league in the same town/city/district could then select a rep side from the players to compete in a 1 day tournament against the other clubs.

The terminology has been set out several times earlier in this thread, but just in case there is any misunderstanding. -

Oztag is the short form of RL Tag -  8-a-side, played on half a pitch, without goal-posts or goal-kicking, 1 point for a try, 2 points for a try in the bonus box, restrictions on kicking.

League Tag is the full version -  11-a-side, full-sized pitch, goal-posts and goal-kicking, same scoring system as Tackle RL, no restrictions on kicking.

Oztag is what TTRL play, and is more suitable for a club running a week-night module/league. Mainly as a social/fitness thing.

We don`t have League Tag in the UK. This is the form I`m suggesting as rep competition for those players who want to step up. Because of its requirements, it will only be viable if embraced by RL clubs. In NSW leagues, their League Tag fixtures are integrated into the gameday schedule.

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3 hours ago, unapologetic pedant said:

 

The terminology has been set out several times earlier in this thread, but just in case there is any misunderstanding. -

Oztag is the short form of RL Tag -  8-a-side, played on half a pitch, without goal-posts or goal-kicking, 1 point for a try, 2 points for a try in the bonus box, restrictions on kicking.

League Tag is the full version -  11-a-side, full-sized pitch, goal-posts and goal-kicking, same scoring system as Tackle RL, no restrictions on kicking.

Oztag is what TTRL play, and is more suitable for a club running a week-night module/league. Mainly as a social/fitness thing.

We don`t have League Tag in the UK. This is the form I`m suggesting as rep competition for those players who want to step up. Because of its requirements, it will only be viable if embraced by RL clubs. In NSW leagues, their League Tag fixtures are integrated into the gameday schedule.

No TTR is similar but not the same as OZTag. Its 7 a side, either single sex or mixed teams. It is 1 point for a Try or 2 points for a female try (where there are mixed teams). Kicking is permitted but not above head height, except when kicking off the ground. Female players have to take the kick offs. 

I do agree it's more suitable as a social/fitness game. 

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5 hours ago, OriginalMrC said:

No TTR is similar but not the same as OZTag. Its 7 a side, either single sex or mixed teams. It is 1 point for a Try or 2 points for a female try (where there are mixed teams). Kicking is permitted but not above head height, except when kicking off the ground. Female players have to take the kick offs. 

I do agree it's more suitable as a social/fitness game. 

The last time I looked at TTR`s rulebook it said the number of players in a team was a matter for each league, but was "typically 7". The OzTag rulebook has always stipulated a "maximum of 8", which implies the number can vary there too. I cited 8 because that`s the figure I`ve seen used by the International Tag Federation at WCs, and my intention was primarily to make clear the distinction between League Tag and the shorter form.

Personally, I think 7 is preferable to 8, given the small size of the pitch. 

Your description of the kicking rules is exactly what I was referring to by "restrictions on kicking".

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Posted (edited)

On the South Coast the amount of women's league tag sides in Group Seven has more than quadrupled since the competition's inception in 2010 - with 20 teams now compared to just Kiama, Jamberoo and Warilla-Lake South during their inaugural campaign.

Not to mention there are now eight junior girls league tag competitions running on the South Coast.

That`s a lot of extra people involved directly with the sport.

 

Edited by The Rocket
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On 29/10/2020 at 22:42, Hela Wigmen said:

Leon Pryce of Bradford in the navy, the furthest Saints player from the ball looks like Dwayne West, then Anthony Sullivan with his arms aloft and Chris Joynt with ball in hand. 

Third Saints player is Tommy Martyn I think. 

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On 25/04/2021 at 00:12, unapologetic pedant said:

The terminology has been set out several times earlier in this thread, but just in case there is any misunderstanding. -

Just used the above quote to get your attention. You probably won`t be able to open the article below, just thought you might be interested in the quote. Sign of the times perhaps, maybe which way the game is evolving.

State of Origin 2021: Was series opener the fastest game of rugby league ever played? (smh.com.au)

"They literally ran the Maroons off their feet. It’s difficult to recall a time in the match when a single NSW body wasn’t in motion, much like a game of touch or OzTag."

Less emphasis on the crunch and more on the other things that can take the game forward.

 

 

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3 hours ago, The Rocket said:

Just used the above quote to get your attention. You probably won`t be able to open the article below, just thought you might be interested in the quote. Sign of the times perhaps, maybe which way the game is evolving.

State of Origin 2021: Was series opener the fastest game of rugby league ever played? (smh.com.au)

"They literally ran the Maroons off their feet. It’s difficult to recall a time in the match when a single NSW body wasn’t in motion, much like a game of touch or OzTag."

Less emphasis on the crunch and more on the other things that can take the game forward.

We can open SMH articles, 5 free per month.

I`m not convinced by the writer`s concentration on quick PTBs. You might recall someone on here posted footage of a game from the late 90s (Western Reds v Castleford) and it was striking how clean the ruck was, and thus how quick the PTBs were. In 2021 set restarts mean the game continues rather than stops for a penalty, but that`s separate from ruck speed.

Insofar as it`s possible to factor out gaps in quality between opposing teams, I think what Origin 1 and the lop-sided NRL scores this year demonstrate is the influence of momentum. This has always been more decisive in RL than other football codes and set restarts have accentuated it.

Coaches and players will have to be more imaginative in devising ways to break momentum.

One example - Currently it`s assumed that after conceding a try the safest option is to boot the restart long, forfeiting any chance of immediately gaining possession other than from an error. Increasingly this is leading to teams scoring back-to-back. Sometimes back-to-back-to-back. Conceding 12 points in 2 minutes or 18 points in 5 minutes is hard to recover from. 

Teams could instead perfect a range of short kick-offs, the sort that would yield a minimum 50% return. Regaining possession shifts momentum better than any defensive tactic currently available.

If they don`t recover the ball, they`ll generally defend tackle 1 between the 30m and 40m lines. On average, following a long kick-off, tackle 1 is defended between the 10m and 20m lines. Is that difference significant enough to warrant kicking away the possibility of winning possession?

In this scenario, the risk/reward calculation is affected by set restarts. A team desperate to halt opposition momentum are more likely to concede 6-again early in the count. I would argue it`s more dangerous and costly to defend an 8 or 9 tackle set from the 10m line than a 6 tackle set from the 30m line. Particularly against a team which has the momentum.

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