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Things you were into before they became popular


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I agree about gin and tonic. With some caveats. I tried in at eighteen, did not like it and did not try it again until 2009 when it was being drunk as an apperitif a lot in Brussels. I started to drink it again, but Gordons and Schweppes was about as posh as I appreciate.

Flat caps are another thing. I donned on in 2011 and it was very practical in the cold damp Boston climate, which is why locals wore them. It also made sense later in Copenhagen when it was a fashion. When I moved to California, it looked daft in the hot dry climate. In contrast, I wore a sun hat.

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"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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There is a In Our Time on the decadent movement, which keeps appearing again and again and the hipster phase was its last incarnation.

There is something to be said for trying new things and accepting that most will just be daft. Flat caps, G&T and beards were brought back by hipsters and are not that bad.

Equally, people used to drinking their lager cold are going to keep drinking their beer cold. That means they will kill good cask beer by serving it at about 4oC, but craft beer is the best compromise.

"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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35 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

In many cases????

I'm not a huge lover of sparkles. They have their place on a warm summers day in the garden, but I do prefer a chenin blanc from vouvray to the three grape mix from Marne.

I much happier drinking and discussing reds rather than whites. However, I can't ever imagine a Prosecco getting anywhere close to the taste, nose, quality and enjoyment that a Vouvray or sparkles from Reims or Épernay. Certainly my experiences they don't.

Just my opinion. As you attest, other opinions are available.

 

We are talking different things though here. We aren't talking fine wines or people being experts we are talking mainstream bubbles being available in bars and restaurants at a decent quality as an alternative to champagne. 

It shouldn't be compared to other whites or reds, it is doing a different job imo. Personally I don't mind a glass or two when I am out, but I find it too drinkable and I drink it like juice, gone in seconds! 

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30 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Prosecco trailed Cava into the market for affordable bubbles that tasted nicer than Lambrini or Asti Spumante. Now Prosecco's success means that supermarkets are encouraged to stock the occasional Cremant or Blanquette. This is a good thing.

Whilst Cava has always been around it never became anything like as mainstream and popular. It was always just seen as cheap bubbles in my experience, whereas Prosecco is treated as a credible drink in its own right. 

When I was younger we used to get free cava from the dj in the pubs if you claimed it was your birthday. God knows what was in that 😆

I'm somebody who enjoys trying the different drinks that are on trend. At home I'm happy to drink lager, wine or gin, ales or Prosecco. It's all good. People like what they like. 

When I go out drinking, I like the effort that goes into making these drinks, although they do come with a hefty price tag. 

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My choice of gin involves going to Sainsbury's and looking for the orange "discounted" stickers. It is actually quite a good way to try different brands.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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3 hours ago, GUBRATS said:

Exactly , if I want to drink gin , I want it to taste like gin , not melon,rosewater,orange or anything else 

 

I don't drink gin, Gubrats, but have a lot of sympathy for your point, as cider is being ruined in the same way.

Cider, for me, is a drink made from - and exclusively from - apples.  If you want to add other stuff to it, fine, go ahead, it's a free country, but please don't call it cider.  I am also depressed to see that the American tautology, 'apple cider', is increasingly prevalent over here.

And then there is 'pear cider'.  If you want to make a proper,fermented drink from pears specifically developed and grown for the purpose, call it 'perry'.  Here is a link to the people who know about this:

National Perry Pear Centre – Conserving a part of our orchard heritage

If you want to use any old pears, including no doubt off cuts from dessert pears used in other processes, call it something else, but not 'cider' or 'perry'.

Rant over!

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There used to be (and possibly still is) Thunderbird. Which was great for getting peed up on the cheap at a gig maybe. There was also Pear Thunderbird, which was for the more dedicated Alkie. 

Merrydown was always a favourite amongst punks as it was both like rocket fuel and tasted not too bad. 

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My dad once came back from playing a gig somewhere with some still cider that someone there had recommended to him. It was in wine box-type packaging and was a still cider. We all agreed it was one of the nicest we'd ever tasted, but never saw it in any shops local to us.

This was way before the internet, and my dad didn't have any bookings in whatever city/town it was for long enough that we forgot to ask him to get some more next time.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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8 hours ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

 

I do hate hipsters and their ability to take run of the mill, everyday things and make them pretentious. Beards is another one, throughout my life since I've been able to grow one I've had beards on and off and then about 10 years ago hipsters started growing them, bushier the better and now I feel like I can't have one cos I will be seen to be copying those idiots. 

Aye, I get you on that. Movember, although meritable, has pushed the ironic beard and tache. Unfortunately too many chaps spend too long growing the facefuzz and are then too vain and smug to get rid of it. No matter how much it doesn't suit them.

Wibble

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1 minute ago, voteronniegibbs said:

Aye, I get you on that. Movember, although meritable, has pushed the ironic beard and tache. Unfortunately too many chaps spend too long growing the facefuzz and are then too vain and smug to get rid of it. No matter how much it doesn't suit them.

Movember is the month I shave my beard/tash completely before returning to hairy captain bird's-eye  look in December 

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12 minutes ago, voteronniegibbs said:

Aye, I get you on that. Movember, although meritable, has pushed the ironic beard and tache. Unfortunately too many chaps spend too long growing the facefuzz and are then too vain and smug to get rid of it. No matter how much it doesn't suit them.

At least, in the Northern hemisphere, Movember's at a good time of year, as you won't develop a 'tache tan-line that'll look weird if you shave it off in December.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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6 hours ago, Futtocks said:

Prosecco, pretentious? It's hen party fuel.

I hadn't tried prosecco until last Christmas when we were given a bottle. I wasn't that keen on it, but what I did like about it was that it filled a pint pot and still left enough in the bottle for Mrs V to have a glass. 

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Wibble

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5 hours ago, Johnoco said:

Apart from Lou Reed having a massive hit in 1972?

He was a bit of a cult character by then I will give you that though. 

Lou Reed was a bit of an ar se. But he wrote some fabulous tunes. I bought transformer in 1973.... then I got into the velvets....

Some things never really go out of fashion.

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13 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

Lou Reed was a bit of an ar se. But he wrote some fabulous tunes. I bought transformer in 1973.... then I got into the velvets....

Some things never really go out of fashion.

in the studio he could hardly understand a word mick ronson was saying with that strong 'ull accent 

did the bloke who invented the phrase "one hit wonder" invent anything else?

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8 minutes ago, graveyard johnny said:

in the studio he could hardly understand a word mick ronson was saying with that strong 'ull accent 

I remember the documentary about the making of that album. Lou Reed said something like Mick had to repeat everything farv tarms before he could understand him.

Fully appreciated his talent though.

Old Faithful we never lose at Wembley

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11 minutes ago, Ullman said:

I remember the documentary about the making of that album. Lou Reed said something like Mick had to repeat everything farv tarms before he could understand him.

Fully appreciated his talent though.

One of the best ever albums in my opinion. Some superb music there. Walk on the wildside is one iconic track for zillions of reasons. So so were other tracks on that album.

The thought of mick and lou spending tarme in the studierrrr.... always makes me chuckle.

 

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4 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

 

The thought of mick and lou spending tarme in the studierrrr.... always makes me chuckle.

 

apparently lou asked mick if he could make the music sound "greyer" mick just thought what the f^^k are you on abart?

did the bloke who invented the phrase "one hit wonder" invent anything else?

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14 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

I'm old enough to remember the watney's party seven. We bought it. We drank it. We pretended we were all grown up.

It was bloody awful

Watney's Party Seven is back on the market. Apparently, the beer inside is of better quality these days.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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20 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

One of the best ever albums in my opinion. Some superb music there. Walk on the wildside is one iconic track for zillions of reasons. So so were other tracks on that album.

The thought of mick and lou spending tarme in the studierrrr.... always makes me chuckle.

 

A three-way conversation of Lou, Mick and Isleworth's own Herbie Flowers trying to decipher each other is something I'd like to hear.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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