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John Drake

Labour leadership contest

Which of the candidates would make you more likely to vote Labour if they win the leadership?  

55 members have voted

  1. 1. Which of the candidates would make you more likely to vote Labour if they win the leadership?

    • Andy Burnham
      13
    • Yvette Cooper
      13
    • Jeremy Corbyn
      14
    • Liz Kendall
      7
    • I would never vote Labour
      8
  2. 2. Did you vote Labour in the 2015 General Election?

    • Yes
      26
    • No
      29
  3. 3. Do you have a vote in the Labour leadership election?

    • Yes
      11
    • No
      44
  4. 4. Who would you vote for in the Labour leadership election?

    • Andy Burnham
      15
    • Yvette Cooper
      13
    • Jeremy Corbyn
      18
    • Liz Kendall
      9


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Former Lib Dem MP, and independent member of the House of Lords, Jenny Tongue (although still a Lib Dem party member she doesn't take the Lib Dem whip in the Lords) is apparently close to joining Labour too.

 

I'm not sure she will be a prize catch.

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I'm not sure she will be a prize catch.

 

I agree, but she will be an embarrassing loss when the 'leader' of the Lib Dems, and the man who hoped he would be leader,  have made such a play of the movement being in the opposite direction.

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If Labour are going to make a success of the Corbyn era that's exactly what they will have to do. Like I think I've said before my constituency MP seems to make the effort to be the MP for all his constituents regardless of their background. On the back of his approach he enjoyed a huge increase in his majority in a constituency with a very varied demographic.

 

Are many MPs like that? I look at this forum and people from either side of the political spectrum seem to be very inflexible in their views. In my limited experience, UK Politics is very similar. I think ckn mentioned last year that political parties in Scotland whilst having different viewpoints actually work together to move forward and do what is best for everyone, not just a few on either side of the political spectrum.

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Are many MPs like that? I look at this forum and people from either side of the political spectrum seem to be very inflexible in their views. In my limited experience, UK Politics is very similar. I think ckn mentioned last year that political parties in Scotland whilst having different viewpoints actually work together to move forward and do what is best for everyone, not just a few on either side of the political spectrum.

I remember Annabel Goldie, former Tory leader in Scotland in an interview going through Tory policies she'd implemented through cross-party negotiations despite being the 4th party there.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" - Mark Twain

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I remember Annabel Goldie, former Tory leader in Scotland in an interview going through Tory policies she'd implemented through cross-party negotiations despite being the 4th party there.

 

Cross-party negotiations... does that happen in Westminister when there isn't a coalition government?

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Are many MPs like that? I look at this forum and people from either side of the political spectrum seem to be very inflexible in their views. In my limited experience, UK Politics is very similar. I think ckn mentioned last year that political parties in Scotland whilst having different viewpoints actually work together to move forward and do what is best for everyone, not just a few on either side of the political spectrum.

 

At a constituency level I'd like to think so; is't that an MPs job, to represent the interests of all of their constituents?


"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

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At a constituency level I'd like to think so; is't that an MPs job, to represent the interests of all of their constituents?

 

It is but does it actually happen? I do not know the answer but if local politics is anything like Westminster, I'd be surprised if it did, especially in areas heavily-dominated by one party like St Helens N/S or Richmond due to polarised views and thinking reminisent of this forum.

Edited by GeordieSaint

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Are many MPs like that? I look at this forum and people from either side of the political spectrum seem to be very inflexible in their views. In my limited experience, UK Politics is very similar. I think ckn mentioned last year that political parties in Scotland whilst having different viewpoints actually work together to move forward and do what is best for everyone, not just a few on either side of the political spectrum.

I can't see Jeremy Corbyn working with the Conservatives on anything ever

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Are many MPs like that? I look at this forum and people from either side of the political spectrum seem to be very inflexible in their views. In my limited experience, UK Politics is very similar. I think ckn mentioned last year that political parties in Scotland whilst having different viewpoints actually work together to move forward and do what is best for everyone, not just a few on either side of the political spectrum.

 

I think you'd be surprised at the level of cross-party cooperation that does exist in parliament. This ranges from strong friendships that develop between members of different parties (Ken Clark and John Prescott, Diane Abbot and Michael Portillo for example), All Party Parliamentary Groupings, signing of Early Day Motions, support for Private Members Bills, the convention of pairing, and what used to be called "the usual channels". Although, the latter, a system of agreeing ways forward between the Whips offices, has arguably become less cooperative over recent years as it was seen as unaccountable and non-transparent - it has now been replaced by the Backbench Business Committee for determining the Commons business timetable. I'm sure that the "usual channels" still exists though.  Having said all that, you have to appreciate that the programmes, indeed the 'aims and values', of the different political parties are often diametrically opposed and the opportunity for compromise is very limited.

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I can't see Jeremy Corbyn working with the Conservatives on anything ever

 

He's already working on keeping them in power.


Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police

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Good.

 

Thanks for the description in #1611.

 

However, that attitude displayed in the quote above is exactly what I mean about inflexibility. It is no wonder when you have people like yourself on the left and people like John M on the right that we have this continuing merry-go-round or vicious circle every few years.

 

C'est la vie!

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Thanks for the description in #1611.

However, that attitude displayed in the quote above is exactly what I mean about inflexibility. It is no wonder when you have people like yourself on the left and people like John M on the right that we have this continuing merry-go-round or vicious circle every few years.

C'est la vie!

If you're working towards similar ends then compromise, co-operation and coalition is possible but, to use your example, JohnM and me are in favour of diametrically opposed goals - he wants capitalism and I want to destroy it.

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Good.

In my opinion all parties should work together on things like national defence and counter terrorism (though Corbyn would disagree with that) but it makes sense for Corbyn to oppose welfare cuts etc

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 but it makes sense for Corbyn to oppose welfare cuts etc

He not only oppose's the cap he wants to get rid of it altogether, it going down well with the dole scroungers/bone idle, labours traditional voters.

His "Lets open the Doors" to the refugees, immigrants, terrorists ain't going down well at all.

 

Is it true he porked Dianne Abbott?

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Is it true he porked Dianne Abbott?

Apparently he did have consensual intercourse with another single person of the same species, yes. Bloody lefties...


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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its his choice of consensual partner that indicates his poor taste and poor decision making and hypocricy. BTW, Im not right wing. I'm a centrist, a one nation Conservative.


Four legs good - two legs bad

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Of all your unfounded assertions this has to be the most laughable. EVERYTHING changed for the working man for the better because of the Attlee government. 

 

Can you actually put some flesh on the bones of this claim that EVERYTHING changed for the working man for the better?  Clearly the working man didn't think do because after just one term and year of post election nervousness, Labour were out.

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Utter drivel. The NHS was formed, the coal, rail and steel industries were nationalised, India was granted independence. The 1948 Education Act gave assistance to schoolchildren from poor backgrounds.

 

The current bunch of squits ... Labour, Tory and LibDem ... are incapable of such achievements

 

Here's one for you. The NHS was never meant to become what it did.  It's accident and not design that saw it become the incredibly inefficient, incredibly expensive organisation it became.

 

As for the rest, well that's socialist ideology laid bare.  A bankrupt country where people are broken, and what does the 'state' do?  Puts the country in hock for decades to come, creates an industrial landscape that leads to punitive tax rates on the lowest paid and drives out any form of progress.

 

Look at what this ideology did over the next few decades, left the UK light years behind the developing economies all around it.

 

The 1947 Housing Act banned the building of private houses and put it all under state control.  That went well.

 

Oh, and when did post war rationing stop?

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That interview was going so well until this bit: "As well as vowing to oppose the current Trade Union Bill, Corbyn says that he supports the repeal of the anti-union laws introduced in the 1980s (“Yes, I do”) , which prohibited flying pickets and solidarity strike action."

 

And then he says he would like a united Ireland.

 

Those pronouncements will be hung around his neck for much longer than Dave's problems with piggate.

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That interview was going so well until this bit: "As well as vowing to oppose the current Trade Union Bill, Corbyn says that he supports the repeal of the anti-union laws introduced in the 1980s (“Yes, I do”) , which prohibited flying pickets and solidarity strike action."

 

And then he says he would like a united Ireland.

 

Those pronouncements will be hung around his neck for much longer than Dave's problems with piggate.

 

I tend to agree. However, if Corbyn is as committed to his "new way of doing politics" as he says he is and sticks to the idea of consensus policies then those may well be overruled by the party membership. Only time will tell.


"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

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I tend to agree. However, if Corbyn is as committed to his "new way of doing politics" as he says he is and sticks to the idea of consensus policies then those may well be overruled by the party membership. Only time will tell.

 

The good thing for Corbyn is that it's four and half years until the next election.

 

So he can get his mistakes out of the way early.

 

Another mistake, I think, is his appointing a vegan woman as his Shadow Agriculture Secretary who apparently thinks that meat eaters should be treated like smokers.

 

I'm not too sure that's going to work.

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