Jump to content

Where do we think Rugby League will be in 5 years time?


Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Marauder said:

I hope your son was good enough to be paid.

When my kids got to 18 they became free to make their own decisions in life and play which sport they wanted.

He suffered a bad injury on a boggy pitch at Bridgend , put him back , was he good enough ? , Probably not 

As for my ' advice ' , well if you don't give ' advice ' or opinions to over 18yr olds , what are you doing on here ? 🤔

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Replies 171
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

For me when Leigh was given the 12th spot in Super League it very much summed it up for me. A competition which has no ambition and is happy to be a a M62 corridor game under the present administratio

Whoever your dealer is, tell him to send some round to ours....

For me it will be concussion which decides the future of the game. We're only at the very early stages of coming to terms with what impact this will have on both codes of rugby. I expect a seismic shi

2 minutes ago, GUBRATS said:

Not got a clue what you're on about , have little to no interest in discussing it , quite simply if you hadn't noticed we're in a global pandemic , which means businesses including sports have to make allowances and operate differently , that includes who it is safe to play when trying to put together International type events 

But you please continue the discussion with whoever is interested enough to do so 

Ah, that old chestnut. 

You enjoy your netball pal. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Dave T said:

I agree with this, it would be interesting to know how many concussions are from bangs on the hip, knee, other tackles head or the ground. 

Yes Munsters concussion in Origin was when  think he slipped over backwards when taking a bomb.

BTW I think you make a very fair point regards the rise of the Pacific Nations being just as much as good luck as good management.

Credit where credits due though those Pacific nations may well stayed at the level they were 5 years ago had not tournaments like the Pacific Cup been pushed a bit harder. That bit of promotion may well have been what led blokes like Fifita to play for those countries and convince others to follow. I think the real test of how committed the NRL are to these countries is if they are prepared to subsidise their match payments instead of just relying on these blokes playing for pride. That would be the real test. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, GUBRATS said:

Some right nonsense on here , the Pacific island teams haven't been ' developed ' by anybody , they're a result of migration from those islands for work , and that those nation's people are ideally suited to Rugby in both its forms 

I lived in NZ in the seventies , the white Kiwi's and some Maori's played Union , the islanders ( I won't use the actual term used as I'm sure it would be construed as rascist ) and the rest of the Maori's played League , at that time League was considered a game for those who enjoyed a good fight 

It's not really considered racist to say 'Islanders' in a NZ context, there were unfortunately more awful terms used to denigrate people from the pacific islands. Plenty of Islanders played rugby union though, I grew up in NZ (Wellington) and although RL clubs were predominantly Māori (it's the singular and plural) and pacifika, with a few Pākehā (Māori term for Europeans), all rugby union clubs in Wellington had a solid representation of both cultures, more so today than in the 70s, and 80s. 

Edited by Newguy
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Newguy said:

It's not really considered racist to say 'Islanders' in a NZ context,

He wasn`t going to use the word `Islander` I think the expression he was avoiding was `coconut`. Yes which is probably best actually avoided but at the Hospital where I used to work, it`s where a Maori friend of mine told be about a Tongan we were both friends with, it was more a reference to how hard their heads were, nothing more, nothing less. Lovely, warm, humorous, intelligent people I ever met.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, The Rocket said:

He wasn`t going to use the word `Islander` I think the expression he was avoiding was `coconut`. Yes which is probably best actually avoided but at the Hospital where I used to work, it`s where a Maori friend of mine told be about a Tongan we were both friends with, it was more a reference to how hard their heads were, nothing more, nothing less. Lovely, warm, humorous, intelligent people I ever met.

Having re-read it, yeah I see what he meant now, cheers for pointing that out Rocket.

Edited by Newguy
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, GUBRATS said:

He suffered a bad injury on a boggy pitch at Bridgend , put him back , was he good enough ? , Probably not 

As for my ' advice ' , well if you don't give ' advice ' or opinions to over 18yr olds , what are you doing on here ? 🤔

Firstly I'm sorry to hear about your son receiving a bad injury, secondly good enough or not, I respect the guy for pulling a jersey on, Thirdly I'm not here to give advice to the over 18's, It's their option if they want to take a little from whatever I or anyone else says.

I'll admit that I have taken a lot from this site and that can be reflected on where my amateur club stands at the moment, sadly this pandemic has probably put us back 2 or 3 years in our planning, but it will have done the same to everyone else, however we are not letting the grass grow under our feet and at the moment are looking into a pitch side clubhouse.

  • Like 1

Carlsberg don't do Soldiers, but if they did, they would probably be Brits.

http://www.pitchero....hornemarauders/

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Rocket said:

He wasn`t going to use the word `Islander` I think the expression he was avoiding was `coconut`. Yes which is probably best actually avoided but at the Hospital where I used to work, it`s where a Maori friend of mine told be about a Tongan we were both friends with, it was more a reference to how hard their heads were, nothing more, nothing less. Lovely, warm, humorous, intelligent people I ever met.

I've just PM'd newguy as I didn't want to post it on here , I have Tongan mates over here  specifically one who worked for me for several years , as you put they are absolutely brilliant people , funnily enough I hadn't heard the term you posted from 1978 when I returned home from NZ till 2006 when a NZ coach Leigh employed used the term for several players we had signed , no malice in its use , just essentially a collective name for the various inhabitants of the PI's 

Edited by GUBRATS
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, GUBRATS said:

I've just PM'd newguy as I didn't want to post it on here , I have Tongan mates over here  specifically one who worked for me for several years , as you put they are absolutely brilliant people , funnily enough I hadn't heard the term you posted from 1978 when I returned home from NZ till 2006 when a NZ coach Leigh employed used the term for several players we had signed , no malice in its use , just essentially a collective name for the various inhabitants of the PI's 

The beauty of the term 'coconut' was that it would include the NZ maoris along with the pacific islanders.  No other term can do that, not 'pacific islanders', nor 'polynesians'.  But yeah, it's not a word I would use if I didn't know the person well enough.

Anyway, back to the topic at hand, I do agree with you, the rise of these pacific nations, a large percentage of it has been down to luck and also, let's not forget the Jason Taumalolo defection, which single-handedly changed the face of RLWC2017 and arguably international RL as a whole.

I do give the Aussies credit for being more accommodating recently, with PNG Hunters in the Qld Cup and the Fiji team joining the NSW system, for example.  But so many Aussies just cannot grasp the sheer size of Europe, compared to Oceania.  Here are a few raw facts;

Australia and PNG (two countries where RL is (almost) the top sport) have a combined population of 33 million.  Which is 80% of the entire Oceania population (41.5 million).

England, or more specifically Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cumbria (where RL is more popular, but still not top sport) has a combined population of 7.5 million, out of 73 million (UK & Ireland), just over 10%.

So obviously, it's much easier for the 'fish in the puddle' than the 'little fish in the ocean'.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, langpark said:

The beauty of the term 'coconut' was that it would include the NZ maoris along with the pacific islanders.  No other term can do that, not 'pacific islanders', nor 'polynesians'.  But yeah, it's not a word I would use if I didn't know the person well enough.

Anyway, back to the topic at hand, I do agree with you, the rise of these pacific nations, a large percentage of it has been down to luck and also, let's not forget the Jason Taumalolo defection, which single-handedly changed the face of RLWC2017 and arguably international RL as a whole.

I do give the Aussies credit for being more accommodating recently, with PNG Hunters in the Qld Cup and the Fiji team joining the NSW system, for example.  But so many Aussies just cannot grasp the sheer size of Europe, compared to Oceania.  Here are a few raw facts;

Australia and PNG (two countries where RL is (almost) the top sport) have a combined population of 33 million.  Which is 80% of the entire Oceania population (41.5 million).

England, or more specifically Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cumbria (where RL is more popular, but still not top sport) has a combined population of 7.5 million, out of 73 million (UK & Ireland), just over 10%.

So obviously, it's much easier for the 'fish in the puddle' than the 'little fish in the ocean'.

That's a interesting way of looking at things, I would think it's more European's who don't grasp the size of Australasia, to to talk of a Queensland derby or the size of some of the areas that make up the group competition's in the same way as discussing Wigan V Saint's or the Pennine league is incomprehensible. For number's we are compact but for distance we baulk at a away game in Cumberland.  How many miles would a NRL team cover (much of it by air) during a season?

 

  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Clogiron said:

That's a interesting way of looking at things, I would think it's more European's who don't grasp the size of Australasia, to to talk of a Queensland derby or the size of some of the areas that make up the group competition's in the same way as discussing Wigan V Saint's or the Pennine league is incomprehensible. For number's we are compact but for distance we baulk at a away game in Cumberland.  How many miles would a NRL team cover (much of it by air) during a season?

True but how is that relevant to anything? We want to increase the size of our sport (size: playong numbers, TV viewers, fans etc.) Not sure what the distances have to do with any of that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, GUBRATS said:

It was me that brought it up in response to the criticism of a possible exiles game , as essentially that is what it is , and of course the use of Netball as a forward thinking sport , they do it = good , we do it = bad 

I agree

I think we keep the Exiles as a fixture, I've been to loads of the games and will again

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Big Picture said:

It happens that Tony Collins and Sean McGuire discussed the game's post-Covid future earlier in the year.

We're all really guessing and playing pundit with the future which mostly depends on the mood we're in when we comment or post. All I'm saying here is that their assessment mabe as loaded or as silly as ours.

Do you recall what they said that seemed useful?

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, The Rocket said:

 

If all tackles are below the waist we might just see more head clashes as tacklers go in.

If the goal is to eliminate all concussions I think they are going to have to find a different way. Professional players may have to sign waivers.

Thats come up in the argument 

I think stats show more concussions are caused by above waist tackles than below 

In addition I'd guess (my opinion no science) ...... 

Union injuries happen in the breakdown - dangerous clearing out etc

League - 10m rule means higher speed impact.... And obviuosly a LOT more tackles in a game

Unfortunately both the above are the respective essences of each code

Not sure what the answer is

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct me if I’m wrong, but from far away it seems that a lot of the Pacific Island success seems to come from simple economics, in that young Pacific Islanders leave their homes to find work in Australia, they have families and their kids learn the game through the Aussie system. This will probably continue as Islanders will seek a better life in Aus, and the players are a by product of this, rather than any grand NRL plan.

  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Oxford said:

We're all really guessing and playing pundit with the future which mostly depends on the mood we're in when we comment or post. All I'm saying here is that their assessment maybe as loaded or as silly as ours.

Do you recall what they said that seemed useful?

I daresay that a historian of the game and the former CEO of a top pro club have a lot better insight into the game's challenges and obstacles than most.  McGuire was pretty shocked by the idea that the game had sunk so low as to need a loan to keep afloat after the previous so-called "golden decade", and he thought that 16 million £ was hardly anything in the grand scheme of things.  Everyone here really should listen to the interviews he did with Tony Collins, they'd learn some hard truths about where the game sits in the UK.

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Big Picture said:

I daresay that a historian of the game and the former CEO of a top pro club have a lot better insight into the game's challenges and obstacles than most.

They'll have certain knowledge and facts but the future is something else entirely.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess the question is does the game as a whole have a 5 year plan looking forwards? You know like most forward thinking businesses. I suspect not, which is worrying, by the same token I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the more forward thinking clubs do have a plan (I’m thinking Leeds, Saints, Warrington, York, maybe a couple of others who might surprise a few individuals). You know the old saying, “failing to plan is planning to fail”. I know COVID will have wrecked many business plans but let’s be honest, pre COVID the game seemed to be marking time, relying on the next World Cup to provide something. Instead the game’s administration should be planning how to use the momentum of the World Cup to move the game forward, but are they?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Oxford said:

And this may just be the start

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/rugby-league/55766086

"Rugby league's community clubs face fight for survival in lockdown"

The statement, "And club volunteers in some of the country's most deprived communities fear it could be a devastating blow to the health and welfare of a generation of youngsters, particularly across the north of England heartlands" is right in line with what Tony Collins and Sean McGuire have discussed in their interviews: the game's unhealthy dependence on areas and towns which are economically disadvantaged/deprived.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Oldbear said:

I guess the question is does the game as a whole have a 5 year plan looking forwards? You know like most forward thinking businesses.

I think the situation will take well run, forward looking and diversified businesses along with it. The only real difference will be how near their cash flow is to uesless.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Oldbear said:

Instead the game’s administration should be planning how to use the momentum of the World Cup to move the game forward, but are they?

Using the momentum of a World Cup would be useful but the situation coming means we'll be lucky to have a game to aspire to.

The thing about the health & welfare of a generation is hardly the stuff of legendary insight though.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, GUBRATS said:

And Harry , how far will the heretige rules be stretched , in 2 more generations how many actual Tongans,Samoans,Fijians will there be who can claim it ?

I guess that depends on the flow of Pacific Islanders who move to Aus in search of a better life and work. Their kids are then born and grow up in Aus, and play the game in Aussie junior comps, some make it all the way. But that’s hardly Australia helping develop the game, it’s just them sitting back and taking advantage of economics, so I’m not sure how much credit they can claim. We don’t have that luxury.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...