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HANetf sponsors Scotland Rugby League for this Autumn’s Rugby League World Cup


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HANetf sponsors Scotland Rugby League for this Autumn’s Rugby League World Cup

15 September 2022

 

  • HANetf will be the headline sponsor for Scotland Rugby League for the upcoming Rugby League World Cup, the 16th staging of the World Cup .
  • HANetf will also be the headline sponsor for Scotland’s wheelchair team. 
  • For the first time, the wheelchair and women’s competition will be part of the Rugby League World Cup main event
  • HANetf will pair Rugby League World Cup games with events for financial advisers across the country, hosted by the Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment

 

September 2022, London

HANetf, Europe’s first full service ‘white label’ ETP platform, is delighted to announce it will be the headline sponsor for Scotland Rugby League for the upcoming Rugby League World Cup. HANetf will be main shirt sponsor for both the men’s and wheelchair teams. 

RLWC21 was postponed from 2021 due to covid and is to be played in October and November. It will be the 16th staging of the World Cup making it the oldest World Cup in any rugby code. This year, more teams than ever will compete for the Rugby League World Cup, with four groups of four nations competing in stadia across England. Scotland are in the same group as Australia, the current world champions, Fiji and Italy. All games will be live on BBC1 and the BBC online platform. The tournament will also be covered globally, including on Fox Sports and Sky Sport in Australia and New Zealand, respectively. 

For the first time, the wheelchair competition will be part of the Rugby League World Cup main event. Rugby League Wheelchair World Cup 2021 will be contested by eight teams. Scotland will be based in Sheffield and will be in Group B including France, USA and Wales. 

Scotland’s men’s team will place its first game on the 16th October against Italy at St James Park in Newcastle. Scotland Wheelchair will play its first game against USA Wheelchair on 4th November at the English Institute of Sport in Sheffield. 

The Rugby League World Cup is one of the longest running World Cup tournaments in world sport. The Rugby League World Cup was first raised by the Fédération Française de Rugby à XIII (FFRXIII) in the 1930s, however it took until 1953 for the rest of the then International Rugby League Board (IRLB) to accept the proposal. Taking place in 1954, the World Cup celebrated the 20th anniversary of France as a Rugby League nation, and featured four nations, Australia, New Zealand, France and Great Britain. 

In 2008 the Great Britain international team separated into Scotland, England, Ireland and Wales. Since then the Scotland Rugby League has gone to gain a well-respected international pedigree, being ranked 15th in the world and 4th in Europe. The team won the Rugby League European Championship in 2014. 

The sponsorship is designed to widen the awareness of the HANetf brand, being the first time the company will feature on terrestrial and satellite television in the UK and globally. As part of the sponsorship HANetf are running events with the Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment (CISI) around the key dates of the Scotland matches, with the first being held in Edinburgh.

One of the founders of HANetf has a long history in rugby league. Hector McNeil founded London-based professional team London Skolars and helped set up Scotland Rugby League in the 1990s. More recently, alongside his wife Sara Giwa-McNeil, he helped found Ghana Rugby League. HANetf also runs the largest ETF event in Europe, named Capital Challenge, that also incorporates Rugby League. Following a morning of ETF presentations and discussions, over 1000 attendees attend a Rugby League hosted at the grounds of the historical Honourable Artillery Company in the heart of the City of London. The event is run in partnership with the Chartered Institute for Securities Institute (CISI). The event has established itself as the best attended ETF event in Europe and is in its 17th year.

Hector McNeil, co-CEO and co-Founder of HANetf comments:

“I’m thrilled HANetf are to sponsor Scotland Rugby League for the upcoming Rugby League World Cup. The Rugby League World Cup is the pinnacle event in international Rugby League and one of the World’s largest sporting tournaments. Like no other form of the game, players compete with the pride of their nation at the heart of every performance. Since the international Great Britain team separated into the four nations in 2008, Scotland’s international team have gone from strength to strength. It is also great that we will be sponsoring that Scotland’s Wheelchair Rugby League team. I believe Wheelchair Rugby League is incredibly exciting to watch and is among the most inclusive sport of all, with non-disabled people welcome to compete, as well as both men and women being able to play in the same team.

As a proud Scotsman I am very excited to see how Scotland progress. I don’t see why the team can’t make it to at least the quarter-finals and beyond. It’s also incredibly exciting to think that the world will be able to see the HANetf brand on the front of the shirts in a match against the current champions and giants of Rugby League, Australia.” 

Victoria Hogg, Chair of Scotland Rugby League 

“Hector McNeil was instrumental in the founding of Scotland Rugby League and we are delighted to be working with HANetf at this very exciting time for Scotland Rugby League. Both our Men’s and Wheelchair squads are looking forward to taking part in this great event, which sees the Wheelchair World Cup being run alongside the Men’s competition for the first time ever. Coverage of the sport via terrestrial and satellite television will showcase our great sport both here in the United Kingdom and globally and we are proud to be part of both World Cup competitions.”

 

Please remember that the value of your investment may go down as well as up and past performance is no indication of future performance. When you trade ETFs, your capital is at risk.

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8 minutes ago, gingerjon said:

That doesn't really answer the question about what a white label ETF platform *is* though.

It's a platform that white label's ETF's.

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"The history of the world is the history of the triumph of the heartless over the mindless." — Sir Humphrey Appleby.

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1 hour ago, Eddie said:

Showing my ignorance here, but I don’t know what a White Label ETP Platform is. Hopefully it’s a good deal for the Scottish RL though. 

ETFs are a form of investment fund (they differ slightly from funds as they are traded on public exchanges - hence the name Exchange Traded Fund). They're pretty normal investments and pretty common - particularly in the US where retail investing is more widely done. 

Like funds, you can invest in ETFs that have different themes or aims - for example geographic themes, sector-focused themes, emerging market themes, ethical themes, sharia-compliant themes, crypto-asset themes, etc. 

White-labelling, (in explain like I'm five" terms) allows institutional investors to create their own theme ETF and trade it. If I wanted to, and I was prepared to lose a lot of money, I could create a "rugby league ETF" which bought shares in a load of rugby league clubs and pool them into a fund (if shares in the clubs were publicly traded).

Edited by whatmichaelsays
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I am really interested in this stuff and so waaaaaayyyyy off topic for the World Cup.

Very briefly:

A Mutual Fund allows you and others to pool some of your money into a fund managed by a 3rd party... he/she then takes pot of money and invests it in 'stuff' (stocks, bonds etc.) and if the fund goes up then your share goes up and you can take it out at a profit (put it in via an ISA or SIPP and you get some tax advantages).

An ETF does something very similar but rather than just pooling the money, you buy a 'share' of the ETF as it is listed on the stock market... i.e. exchange traded.  Overall the same principal - if the whole thing goes up then your share of it goes up.

There is something similar in Investment Trusts which are similar to ETF's as they are listed companies but they are also able to borrow money so can provide added leverage.  Again, you buy and sell shares of an Investment Trust on the stock market the same as any other share.

A lot of Mutual Funds, ETF's and Investment Trusts focus on a particular market segment - either geography (i.e. emerging markets) or verticals (i.e. healthcare)

As Michael says, the 'white label' part is simply someone providing an ETF via a platform rather than it being packaged and sold via a typical and established provider (BlackRock, Vanguard for example) and reduces the barrier to entry.  Of course, being white labelled they may offer more risk as people may 'trust' an established provider more.

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"The history of the world is the history of the triumph of the heartless over the mindless." — Sir Humphrey Appleby.

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17 minutes ago, Dunbar said:

I am really interested in this stuff and so waaaaaayyyyy off topic for the World Cup.

Very briefly:

A Mutual Fund allows you and others to pool some of your money into a fund managed by a 3rd party... he/she then takes pot of money and invests it in 'stuff' (stocks, bonds etc.) and if the fund goes up then your share goes up and you can take it out at a profit (put it in via an ISA or SIPP and you get some tax advantages).

An ETF does something very similar but rather than just pooling the money, you buy a 'share' of the ETF as it is listed on the stock market... i.e. exchange traded.  Overall the same principal - if the whole thing goes up then your share of it goes up.

There is something similar in Investment Trusts which are similar to ETF's as they are listed companies but they are also able to borrow money so can provide added leverage.  Again, you buy and sell shares of an Investment Trust on the stock market the same as any other share.

A lot of Mutual Funds, ETF's and Investment Trusts focus on a particular market segment - either geography (i.e. emerging markets) or verticals (i.e. healthcare)

As Michael says, the 'white label' part is simply someone providing an ETF via a platform rather than it being packaged and sold via a typical and established provider (BlackRock, Vanguard for example) and reduces the barrier to entry.  Of course, being white labelled they may offer more risk as people may 'trust' an established provider more.

I’ve decided not to invite you to my birthday party 

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1 minute ago, DavidM said:

I’ve decided not to invite you to my birthday party 

Come on... I can discuss Marvel comic books, investment types and Rugby League... your only problem would be all the women clamouring to get in!

"The history of the world is the history of the triumph of the heartless over the mindless." — Sir Humphrey Appleby.

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2 minutes ago, Dunbar said:

Come on... I can discuss Marvel comic books, investment types and Rugby League... your only problem would be all the women clamouring to get in!

You mistakenly said in instead of out .My birthday is on Wednesday by the way , not that I’m just randomly telling people . Not at all .

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1 hour ago, Dunbar said:

I am really interested in this stuff and so waaaaaayyyyy off topic for the World Cup.

Very briefly:

A Mutual Fund allows you and others to pool some of your money into a fund managed by a 3rd party... he/she then takes pot of money and invests it in 'stuff' (stocks, bonds etc.) and if the fund goes up then your share goes up and you can take it out at a profit (put it in via an ISA or SIPP and you get some tax advantages).

An ETF does something very similar but rather than just pooling the money, you buy a 'share' of the ETF as it is listed on the stock market... i.e. exchange traded.  Overall the same principal - if the whole thing goes up then your share of it goes up.

There is something similar in Investment Trusts which are similar to ETF's as they are listed companies but they are also able to borrow money so can provide added leverage.  Again, you buy and sell shares of an Investment Trust on the stock market the same as any other share.

A lot of Mutual Funds, ETF's and Investment Trusts focus on a particular market segment - either geography (i.e. emerging markets) or verticals (i.e. healthcare)

As Michael says, the 'white label' part is simply someone providing an ETF via a platform rather than it being packaged and sold via a typical and established provider (BlackRock, Vanguard for example) and reduces the barrier to entry.  Of course, being white labelled they may offer more risk as people may 'trust' an established provider more.

 

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9 minutes ago, RugbyLeagueGeek said:

 

I actually watched that episode of Red Dwarf this week.

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"The history of the world is the history of the triumph of the heartless over the mindless." — Sir Humphrey Appleby.

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7 hours ago, whatmichaelsays said:

ETFs are a form of investment fund (they differ slightly from funds as they are traded on public exchanges - hence the name Exchange Traded Fund). They're pretty normal investments and pretty common - particularly in the US where retail investing is more widely done. 

Like funds, you can invest in ETFs that have different themes or aims - for example geographic themes, sector-focused themes, emerging market themes, ethical themes, sharia-compliant themes, crypto-asset themes, etc. 

White-labelling, (in explain like I'm five" terms) allows institutional investors to create their own theme ETF and trade it. If I wanted to, and I was prepared to lose a lot of money, I could create a "rugby league ETF" which bought shares in a load of rugby league clubs and pool them into a fund (if shares in the clubs were publicly traded).

Cant argue with much of that. impressive

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On 17/09/2022 at 00:25, whatmichaelsays said:

ETFs are a form of investment fund (they differ slightly from funds as they are traded on public exchanges - hence the name Exchange Traded Fund). They're pretty normal investments and pretty common - particularly in the US where retail investing is more widely done. 

Like funds, you can invest in ETFs that have different themes or aims - for example geographic themes, sector-focused themes, emerging market themes, ethical themes, sharia-compliant themes, crypto-asset themes, etc. 

White-labelling, (in explain like I'm five" terms) allows institutional investors to create their own theme ETF and trade it. If I wanted to, and I was prepared to lose a lot of money, I could create a "rugby league ETF" which bought shares in a load of rugby league clubs and pool them into a fund (if shares in the clubs were publicly traded).

Are any Super League clubs publicly traded?

Brisbane Broncos are over here.

Edited by Pulga

new rise.jpg

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