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Hi sorry for the technical question but just looking for a few tips.

So last season I switched to half back and enjoyed it. After assessing my game over the last few months I think it’s fair to say I’m not the fastest scrum half and I’m not a maverick type player who’s going to throw long passes round my back or through my legs etc. However, I feel my skill set is pretty strong, I can pass off both hands, I can kick well, I enjoy getting the physical side of the game and getting off the line defensively. I feel like my game management is improving.

I’ve been speaking to people about my game and one thing that’s come up a bit is that I need to be more vocal and organise/direct the team around the pitch better because moving forward that’s probably the type of player I need to be. I watched a podcast recently where it basically said that players like Thurston and Cronk are the loudest players on the pitch whenever they play, they tell their 9 what to do with the ball at the ruck etc in terms of what way to go and organise the shape around them. How important a quality would you say this is for a 7 and does anyone have any tips on doing it well?

Thank you.

Edited by JonJon9898

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If you want to see what difference an organising half back can make to a game watch a full match replay of the 2018 NRL Grand Final.

Watch the match twice. Once to see the game unfold and again to focus on the role of Cooper Cronk. He played that game with a fracture through the width of his scapula and as such was unable to take much contact but he still played a vital role with his organisational skills.

Watch how he directs each play but, more importantly, how he is already looking at the next play as the current one unfolds and watch how he manages the field position of the Roosters.

Communication for a half back is not just about the spine, he should also be looking to direct the first plays by ensuring the middles do their work correctly. It's not about being the loudest, it's about being the smartest.

Finally, as you will typically be defending alongside an edge forward make sure that you get your communication and defensive structures right in defence. Don't be a weak link.

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Communication is the number one priority for a 7 mate.

 

I remember when I got brought into the senior mens training at 14/15 as I kid with talent, but probably not the confidence to boss grown men around.

My coach told me, every time I stop talking, whether I have the ball or not, one of our props (These were pro players by the way) would run over me. 

 

Safe to say it took 3 times of that happening to keep me talking. Old school, but honestly, your job is to talk the team around at 7. The big guys get tired, you are there to do their thinking for them.

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Getting someone to talk on the pitch is, in my opinion, one of the hardest skills to develop. A lot of it comes down to understanding the game at a good level because the players around the player in question have to believe that person knows what they are doing.  In junior rugby its quite a problem in that you can teach different skills to players but to get someone on the pitch at a young age and been able to take a team around the field is pretty difficult.

Personally for me I would put more worth on a scrum half with very little skill but a big mouth who can take the team around the field over a scrum half with the razzle dazzle skills that were mentioned at least at amateur and junior level anyway.

Not sure about tips but all I would say is study the game and go deeper in to game plans and the players that execute them also speak to your coach afterall its his gameplan you are probably going to be following. By the sounds of it you are putting it in when defending which always gets respect from the bigger/older players so maybe speak to them away from the pitch about your concerns over bossing them around, you will get more respect from doing that and to be fair most of the big guys just want to hit the ball up hard so you are not stopping them doing that just moving them to where you want them to do that so they won't be bothered.

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Your either vocal or you ain't, it's very difficult to install that into someone. But it's a major role of a scrum Half, or a good one at that. All the best, you'll probably find your role albeit if it's 7 or not

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Just be aware that constant talking can also be a cause if indecision in other players if you're giving them too little time to react.

Try to talk about the next play rather than the one you're in. A word to a second rower or centre that they should be on your left shoulder for the next play will do wonders for their confidence and make them more likely to continue to listen to you.

I'd also recommend you have nominated leaders of the defence. (I've always used to two centres controlling the left and right sides in conjunction with the fullback). Talking for an entire game will sap your energy and additionally these players will be in a better position to lead the defensive line.

I'd also have an "overide" word (I used the word "boss"). If you shout that it just means all previous calls are null and void and that the half back should just pass the ball to you...and that you expect players to be in support. Don't overuse it, (as again it can lead to frustration in you team if they feel they're just being barked at with no time to organise and plan), but if the team understands and follows the instruction it can be useful as there will always be time when there's a opportunity to be capitalised on.

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www.fatalerror.co.nz - A Musical by Lattimer & McRae

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Get the team captain to lay down the law in the pre-game dressing room and at Training every week.   "Just get your heads down and each man concentrate on his own job. Listen to Jon; he spots the whole picture.


Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police

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And turn up for the game carrying a copy of the Times or Telegraph. They'll think you must be intelligent. Reinforce it by always calling the ref "Sir" and never arguing about the decision.

If there's the slightest hint of sunshine, turn up wearing a pair of cool shades.*

😎

* I got two pairs for £6 (less than half price) from the Arco sale when the previous model was being discontinued. My two biker mates asked me to get them some. I have a friend who's 82; she wanted some too.

https://www.arco.co.uk/products/3E4700?s=1

 

Edited by Wolford6
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Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police

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On 08/02/2020 at 07:37, JonJon9898 said:

Hi sorry for the technical question but just looking for a few tips.

So last season I switched to half back and enjoyed it. After assessing my game over the last few months I think it’s fair to say I’m not the fastest scrum half and I’m not a maverick type player who’s going to throw long passes round my back or through my legs etc. However, I feel my skill set is pretty strong, I can pass off both hands, I can kick well, I enjoy getting the physical side of the game and getting off the line defensively. I feel like my game management is improving.

I’ve been speaking to people about my game and one thing that’s come up a bit is that I need to be more vocal and organise/direct the team around the pitch better because moving forward that’s probably the type of player I need to be. I watched a podcast recently where it basically said that players like Thurston and Cronk are the loudest players on the pitch whenever they play, they tell their 9 what to do with the ball at the ruck etc in terms of what way to go and organise the shape around them. How important a quality would you say this is for a 7 and does anyone have any tips on doing it well?

Thank you.

And learn how to count numbers on each side of the ruck and passing the ball to the side where you have an overlap.  

Organisational skills probably surpass skills.  Any decent half back has the skills it's controlling the play where you stand out

Maybe read a book by some great half backs e.g. Andrew johns to see how they play 

 

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On 08/02/2020 at 08:00, Dunbar said:

If you want to see what difference an organising half back can make to a game watch a full match replay of the 2018 NRL Grand Final.

Watch the match twice. Once to see the game unfold and again to focus on the role of Cooper Cronk. He played that game with a fracture through the width of his scapula and as such was unable to take much contact but he still played a vital role with his organisational skills.

Watch how he directs each play but, more importantly, how he is already looking at the next play as the current one unfolds and watch how he manages the field position of the Roosters.

Communication for a half back is not just about the spine, he should also be looking to direct the first plays by ensuring the middles do their work correctly. It's not about being the loudest, it's about being the smartest.

Finally, as you will typically be defending alongside an edge forward make sure that you get your communication and defensive structures right in defence. Don't be a weak link.

Excellent post 

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A good half back is like a conductor of an orchestra.  He controls most plays telling who is to get the ball on each tackle.  The whole set is planned out befofe hand.  Getting to a certain part of the field.

Last tackle options are important.  Realising how much time is left on the clock and going for.thr right play at the time.

 

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Learn players runs on your team, play off the shoulder of your forwards who make the hard yards, be the link to the three quarters,you don't have to be quick, just be in the right place at the right time.

If you are willing to take a knock,take the ball to the line, draw players in creating a gap and make sure that your team mates run through the gap that you created.

I got sent off once when I was creating the space and my team mate didn't get it to run through the gap,after the 6th time being tomatoes by the opponent's I threw the ball at him at a few punches lol

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Just wondering if there are any video aids out there for specific positions? Apart from the Karma Sutra of course!

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On 10/02/2020 at 07:21, kier said:

Just be aware that constant talking can also be a cause if indecision in other players if you're giving them too little time to react.

Try to talk about the next play rather than the one you're in. A word to a second rower or centre that they should be on your left shoulder for the next play will do wonders for their confidence and make them more likely to continue to listen to you.

I'd also recommend you have nominated leaders of the defence. (I've always used to two centres controlling the left and right sides in conjunction with the fullback). Talking for an entire game will sap your energy and additionally these players will be in a better position to lead the defensive line.

I'd also have an "overide" word (I used the word "boss"). If you shout that it just means all previous calls are null and void and that the half back should just pass the ball to you...and that you expect players to be in support. Don't overuse it, (as again it can lead to frustration in you team if they feel they're just being barked at with no time to organise and plan), but if the team understands and follows the instruction it can be useful as there will always be time when there's a opportunity to be capitalised on.

What a fabulous post 

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11 hours ago, JonJon9898 said:

Thank you all for your replies, I’m very greatful.

make sure all the players around you can spell, even if it means they are not grateful 


the grass may be greener on the other side of the fence but the crows are just as black

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