Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Trojan

Professional Northerners

Recommended Posts

10 hours ago, Tongs ya bas said:

There are differences in accent, inflection and vocabulary within the west riding, even in neighbouring towns. It's very interesting, and quite remarkable how these differences have stood up

There is a very noticeable break in the way people in West Yorkshire speak (West Riding used to include places that are now in Cumbria and Lancashire) the break seems to come around Wakefield.  Ossetters (I'm married to one so should know) speak more like me, people from Ponte, Cas & Fev speak slightly differently, with more rounded vowels. Again around Huddersfield and 'Fax they speak slightly differently.  These things fascinate me.  The way people speak in Marsden, is very different from the way they speak in Dobcross and Diggle, only three or four miles away, and yet at one time they were all part of the West Riding, indeed fairly recently there was a move in the Saddleworth district of Oldham for reunification with Yorkshire (they have a white rose for their area's badge.)

Edited by Trojan

“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Padge said:

There is a distinct difference in Wigan accents between North and South, a matter of 3 miles, though the difference is becoming less especially over the last 20 years.

 

If you save up and go for your brunch at Bents just off the East Lancs Road you can hear just about every different local accent among the young women working there.  The Newton accent is very different to the Leigh, to the St Helens, Warrington, to the various Wigans, and along to the West side of Salford.  I find it fascinating while picking over my unfeasibly expensive plate of processed pork products.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Trojan said:

There is a very noticeable break in the way people in West Yorkshire speak (West Riding used to include places that are now in Cumbria and Lancashire) the break seems to come around Wakefield.  Ossetters (I'm married to one so should know) speak more like me, people from Ponte, Cas & Fev speak slightly differently, with more rounded vowels. Again around Huddersfield and 'Fax they speak slightly differently.  These things fascinate me.  The way people speak in Marsden, is very different from the way they speak in Dobcross and Diggle, only 3 or four miles away, and yet at one time they were all part of the West Riding, indeed fairly recently there was a move in the Saddleworth district of Oldham for reunification with Yorkshire (they have a white rose for their area's badge.)

Peter Rowe... rowvers ex coawch....

The W isn't anywhere near as prominent in wakey and absent in ossett

Edited by Robin Evans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

Peter Rowe... rowvers ex coawch....

The W isn't anywhere near as prominent in wakey and absent in ossett

Exactly


“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone who lives in the south I sometimes find myself being a professional northerner and TBPH I'm really good at it!

 


RL1.JPG.6a10be03c5528650e188f078de012540.JPG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An almost pointless qualification that appeals when I retire is a degree in linguistics and the study of regional dialects. I've always had an interest in how language can change even so subtly even between communities.

Gateshead and Heaton.  But Geordie.... both strong accents within a similar demographic. But slight differences are there to hear pet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Oxford said:

As someone who lives in the south I sometimes find myself being a professional northerner and TBPH I'm really good at it!

 

My cousin moved to Norfolk in the fifties, and after two or three years, despite his nickname being "Yorkie" he didn't sound any different to the locals (at least to us) whereas my daughter moved to Salisbury in 2003 and still has her unpolluted Leeds accent, indeed her nickname at work is "Leeds."


“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do find myself channeling my inner Hugh Grant when I head north or when speaking to Americans.
"Gosh, really. That would be super"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

An almost pointless qualification that appeals when I retire is a degree in linguistics and the study of regional dialects. I've always had an interest in how language can change even so subtly even between communities.

Gateshead and Heaton.  But Geordie.... both strong accents within a similar demographic. But slight differences are there to hear pet.

I'd love to do something like that. Professor Stanley Ellis pin pointed the area that the notorious "I'm Jack" Ripper tapes came from almost to the street.  When the police didn't find the Ripper he was convinced that they were looking for the wrong man, and it turned out that he was right. Not only was Peter Sutcliffe, a Bradford man eventually convicted of the crimes, but the perpetrator of the hoax, when later trapped by DNA evidence, lived in exactly the area that Ellis had predicted.

Edited by Trojan

“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Shadow said:

I do find myself channeling my inner Hugh Grant when I head north or when speaking to Americans.
"Gosh, really. That would be super"

Surely that's Dick Van Dyke in your case!;)


RL1.JPG.6a10be03c5528650e188f078de012540.JPG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Trojan said:

There is a very noticeable break in the way people in West Yorkshire speak (West Riding used to include places that are now in Cumbria and Lancashire) the break seems to come around Wakefield.  Ossetters (I'm married to one so should know) speak more like me, people from Ponte, Cas & Fev speak slightly differently, with more rounded vowels. Again around Huddersfield and 'Fax they speak slightly differently.  These things fascinate me.  The way people speak in Marsden, is very different from the way they speak in Dobcross and Diggle, only three or four miles away, and yet at one time they were all part of the West Riding, indeed fairly recently there was a move in the Saddleworth district of Oldham for reunification with Yorkshire (they have a white rose for their area's badge.)

A friend of mine could pinpoint which parts of Dewsbury or Wakefield people originated in from the way they spoke.

For many years I worked in Sheffield and the Yorkshire accent there was very different to where I lived.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody who was born in the North, made a bit of cash and moved to Berkshire, then spent 50 years banging on about how great Barnsley is !    Can't stand the bloke !!

Leeds has quite diverse accents  -  those of the Northern suburbs (Alwoodley, Adel, Moortown) are very different to those you hear in Belle Isle, Middleton or Seacroft.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Urban Barnsley is a depressed dreary sheeite hole. Rotherham is even worse.

Parky's musings of the 'tarn' bore no resemblance to reality..... Well, not for me it didn't.

I don't get why it's made out to be something it isn't. Ken loach depicted the stark reality of growing up in northern towns. Peter Kay comicallydoes the same. I can identify with both

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Robin Evans said:

Urban Barnsley is a depressed dreary sheeite hole. Rotherham is even worse.

Parky's musings of the 'tarn' bore no resemblance to reality..... Well, not for me it didn't.

I don't get why it's made out to be something it isn't. Ken loach depicted the stark reality of growing up in northern towns. Peter Kay comicallydoes the same. I can identify with both

Of course Parky's from  Cudworth (Cud'orth) which is bordering on the greater  RL watershed. Certainly when Wakey were in their pmnp in the 60's there used to be coaches from Cudworth and Brierley parked at Belle Vue.  So perhaps Parky has leavening of RL sanity :) ?

Edited by Trojan

“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The starkest change in linguistics has to be between longtown and Gretna, 5 miles apart either side of the border. 

  • Like 2

Rugby League is a sport that desperately needs to expand its geographical supporter base and its player base. This imperative means that all other requirements are secondary until this is done.

All power in the game should be with governing bodies, especially international governing bodies.

Without these actions we will remain a minor sport internationally and nationally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, nec said:

The starkest change in linguistics has to be between longtown and Gretna, 5 miles apart either side of the border. 

Great call. I've wondered about that as well. I guess it's the direction from which towns either side of the border pull their cultural references from historically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, nec said:

The starkest change in linguistics has to be between longtown and Gretna, 5 miles apart either side of the border. 

I can't speak about Cumbria and Scotland because I've been to both places so seldom.  The  occasion that sticks in my memory most was a farm just over the border.  I left the M6 just north of Carlisle, drove up an ordinary A road, turned right on to a B road, and the farm was on the right just over a small hump-backed bridge.  I asked the machine operator where the border was and he indicated the bridge, no sign no nothing.  Whether the way of speaking changed I'll never know, the driver spoke in a Cumbrian accent. whether he was Scottish of English I didn't ask.


“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, nec said:

The starkest change in linguistics has to be between longtown and Gretna, 5 miles apart either side of the border. 

What about between the eastern edge of Liverpool and St Helens? You can't really tell where Prescott ends and St Helens begins nowadays but you do leave the Scouse accent. Same with Skelmersdale and Up Holland; Scouse to Wigan in a few hundred yards.

  • Like 1

"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Griff9of13 said:

What about between the eastern edge of Liverpool and St Helens? You can't really tell where Prescott ends and St Helens begins nowadays but you do leave the Scouse accent. Same with Skelmersdale and Up Holland; Scouse to Wigan in a few hundred yards.

The Skem Up holland thing is understandable. New Skem was populated by scousers and Old Skem was very much a place of Lancashire accents. Before new Skem being built there was a large gap between Up Holland and Liverpool, that gap still exists but people where moving en mass from Liverpool into new Skem. 

 


Visit my photography site www.padge.smugmug.com

Radio 5 Live: Saturday 14 April 2007

Dave Whelan "In Wigan rugby will always be king"

 

This country's wealth was created by men in overalls, it was destroyed by men in suits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“German and Spanish are accessible to foreigners: English is not accessible even to Englishmen.”  Pygmalion

“Remember that you are a human being with a soul and the divine gift of articulate speech: that your native language is the language of Shakespear and Milton and The Bible; and don't sit there crooning like a bilious pigeon.” Pygmalion

I think Swinton and Salford may prove as close as it gets for big linguistic differences.

As the only fessed up member of the professional northerner club on here I have to say

I had to travel to't top o't page for a chuffin' reminder of what this thread were about!

 

 

 


RL1.JPG.6a10be03c5528650e188f078de012540.JPG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Oxford said:

“German and Spanish are accessible to foreigners: English is not accessible even to Englishmen.”  Pygmalion

“Remember that you are a human being with a soul and the divine gift of articulate speech: that your native language is the language of Shakespear and Milton and The Bible; and don't sit there crooning like a bilious pigeon.” Pygmalion

I think Swinton and Salford may prove as close as it gets for big linguistic differences.

As the only fessed up member of the professional northerner club on here I have to say

I had to travel to't top o't page for a chuffin' reminder of what this thread were about!

 

 

 

Nice quotes. Absolute rubbish, though!

English is accessible to my Greek students who are as young as 14. One of them writes better English than some of the posters on here.

English is not the language of the Bible. English didn't exist 2000 years ago.

Not trying to cause offence, just pointing out that soundbites never carried any real intellectual gravitas.

 


Rethymno Rugby League Appreciation Society

Founder (and, so far, only) member.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, tonyXIII said:

Not trying to cause offence, just pointing out that soundbites never carried any real intellectual gravitas.

Apart from your assertions about English being easy what about them quotes being just a bit of fun.

And King James said it were his book for Desert Island discs and that were good enough for me!

Edited by Oxford
  • Haha 1

RL1.JPG.6a10be03c5528650e188f078de012540.JPG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...