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If we’re getting into pub games then the classic ‘thumb man’ must surely be up there.

It’s often played in combination with other drinking games.

Basic premise is the last person to place their thumb flat on the edge of the table has to take a decent sip of beer.

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I managed to bunk off PE for a whole half term. The sport I missed was basketball. My end of term report gave me a B and said I'd learnt new skills. Which was sort of true.

Calcio Fiorentino - Wikipedia

No, much too small scale for that, and has always kept it amateur for the players.  The top clubs tend to come from villages, such as Newtonmore and Kingussie in the Spey Valley, and Kyles Athletic, t

3 hours ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

How about shin-kicking? Obviously a very popular and well practiced sport in town centres all across the land when people have had a few too many but still pretty niche when it comes to organised events. 

Lost it's way when my name was outlawed.

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On 29/04/2021 at 18:05, gingerjon said:

Blimey.

Thanks for that. I wonder if demographic shifts also did for them.

A non professional regional sport that has died in the past few years from being pretty popular in an area would be British baseball. Teams in Cardiff/Newport and Liverpool. Now essentially moribund.

your post had me thinking about Rounders, which most of us played as youngsters. If only to join in with the girls...

I was surprised to read on trawling the web that their is an England elite team...

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8 minutes ago, redjonn said:

Surprised Shinty hasn't been mentioned.

It has 🙂

Fives? Played at Rugby, Winchester and places of that sort.

Lacrosse obviously gets played at posh schools and at universities, but the area round Stockport has dominated in England for 125+ years.

Samoan Cricket - bit like cricket elsewhere but very different bats and no restrictions on team numbers, age, gender, fairly fluid rules.

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Basque pelota

Seems its played elsewhere on a small scale (mainly Spanish speaking countries), but only in the Basque region is it played professionally

Was in Bilbao about 4 years ago and the locals were glued to the tv's in the bars when it was on

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48 minutes ago, JonM said:

Samoan Cricket - bit like cricket elsewhere but very different bats and no restrictions on team numbers, age, gender, fairly fluid rules.

There's a chapter in Arthur Grimble's autobiography 'A Pattern of Islands' on the introduction of Cricket to the Pacific Islands and what the game was like there before the authorities stepped in to tame it and cut down the intimidation and mass bloodshed. Sounds extremely entertaining... from a distance.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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Remember as a kid going on a family holiday to Guernsey - would have been about 1975 - and the whole island was covered in Softball teams. As I come from a mad keen cricketing family, we quite enjoyed watching the games in the evenings, and there were two divisions ! 

I have no idea if they still play it there, and don't know if it was/is played in Jersey too....

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2 hours ago, redjonn said:

your post had me thinking about Rounders, which most of us played as youngsters. If only to join in with the girls...

I was surprised to read on trawling the web that their is an England elite team...

Tiny Ginger's first posh school took rounders seriously (for girls only) until a few of the parents (in my mind, rightly) decided that they'd rather that cricket was an option for girls too and thus after that rounders essentially vanished.

Also locally we have stoolball.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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1 hour ago, RBKnight said:

Remember as a kid going on a family holiday to Guernsey - would have been about 1975 - and the whole island was covered in Softball teams. As I come from a mad keen cricketing family, we quite enjoyed watching the games in the evenings, and there were two divisions ! 

I have no idea if they still play it there, and don't know if it was/is played in Jersey too....

I recall watching it being played in Guernsey on a summer evening in about 1981, at the outdoor part of the leisure centre in St Peter Port (or town, as I think it is often known locally, e.g on bus destination blinds).

It looks as though it still is played in both Channel Island bailiwicks too:

GUERNSEY – Guernsey Softball association | European Softball Federation

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On 29/04/2021 at 19:02, Wiltshire Warrior Dragon said:

Did you know there was also a sport called bando, which seems to have flourished on dry land, not ice, in South Wales in the 19th century?  The Margam Bando Boys were celebrated in a 19th century poem.  In Victorian times, the maxim for team sports seems to have been 'get codified or die'.  Bando, it would seem, did the latter.

Never heard of it, and very much doubt that it was ever professional.

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2 hours ago, The Frying Scotsman said:

And not professional either.

I doubt Samoan cricket or 5s & 3s dominoes are either.

Anyway, whoever hails the ball in each game of Uppies & Downies makes a fair few quid out of it.

I’m not prejudiced, I hate everybody equally

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Some good examples here. I suppose bandy is probably the most similar to RL, I'd vaguely heard the name but had no clue there was a pro-sport. If ice hockey didn't exist, I'm sure I'd be more aware of it.

I remember trying to watch a game of shinty they had on the TV once, it was a final of some sort.

Muay Thai is a good one, when I was in Thailand I remember seeing people gathered around the TV watching it in the middle of the day.

I suppose my original conclusion still applies about British culture and professional sport. There are a number of sports that have a worldwide presence but are still very British-centric. There can't be another country with so many obvious avenues for pro-sport (maybe the US). If you are British, without emigrating, you can be a professional in:

Football

Rugby U

Rugby L

Tennis

Golf

Snooker

Darts

Ice hockey

Basketball

Boxing

MMA

Athletics

 

I'm sure there are others! 

 

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7 minutes ago, Maximus Decimus said:

Some good examples here. I suppose bandy is probably the most similar to RL, I'd vaguely heard the name but had no clue there was a pro-sport. If ice hockey didn't exist, I'm sure I'd be more aware of it.

I remember trying to watch a game of shinty they had on the TV once, it was a final of some sort.

Muay Thai is a good one, when I was in Thailand I remember seeing people gathered around the TV watching it in the middle of the day.

I suppose my original conclusion still applies about British culture and professional sport. There are a number of sports that have a worldwide presence but are still very British-centric. There can't be another country with so many obvious avenues for pro-sport (maybe the US). If you are British, without emigrating, you can be a professional in:

Football

Rugby U

Rugby L

Tennis

Golf

Snooker

Darts

Ice hockey

Basketball

Boxing

MMA

Athletics

 

I'm sure there are others! 

 

You could also be a professional in cricket, hockey, horse racing, cycling and any sport that wins Olympic medals (thanks to UK Sport paying athletes to convert to those sports).

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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11 minutes ago, gingerjon said:

You could also be a professional in cricket, hockey, horse racing, cycling and any sport that wins Olympic medals (thanks to UK Sport paying athletes to convert to those sports).

I knew I'd miss some but cricket was a pretty big one 😂

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46 minutes ago, Maximus Decimus said:

Some good examples here. I suppose bandy is probably the most similar to RL, I'd vaguely heard the name but had no clue there was a pro-sport. If ice hockey didn't exist, I'm sure I'd be more aware of it.

I remember trying to watch a game of shinty they had on the TV once, it was a final of some sort.

Muay Thai is a good one, when I was in Thailand I remember seeing people gathered around the TV watching it in the middle of the day.

I suppose my original conclusion still applies about British culture and professional sport. There are a number of sports that have a worldwide presence but are still very British-centric. There can't be another country with so many obvious avenues for pro-sport (maybe the US). If you are British, without emigrating, you can be a professional in:

Football

Rugby U

Rugby L

Tennis

Golf

Snooker

Darts

Ice hockey

Basketball

Boxing

MMA

Athletics

 

I'm sure there are others! 

 

There are motor sports too, though I confess I din't follow any of them.

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12 hours ago, Derwent said:

I doubt Samoan cricket or 5s & 3s dominoes are either.

Anyway, whoever hails the ball in each game of Uppies & Downies makes a fair few quid out of it.

I didn't know the word 'hail' was used in the Workington game, Derwent, so thanks for that.  It also seen it used in the Alnwick street football match.  Likewise, it was the early, English word used for a goal in shinty.

When I persuaded an English colleague of mine in Northallerton to travel up to St Andrews with my scratch team, after we were invited to play in the university shinty club's 6-a-side tournament in the mid-1970s, he knicknamed me "Two hail" because I was lucky enough to score both our goals, as we won our first game, 2-1 (we lost our other two, so didn't make the knock-out stage!)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some musings on previous posts

Table Skittles with a wooden " cheese" was very popular in Warwickshire

Crown Green bowling The most Southerly club in England was in Kenilworth they competed in the very strong Coventry League.

Softball... Whilst I was at school we ONCE played a PE lesson of Softball. By luck mostly I managed to hit the ball first go. A view days later one of my mates called to me to look at the message board and it seems I was picked to play as one of the players in the school team on the following Saturday. On the Friday before the game was cancelled...and that was it. It was never mentioned again.

 Fast forward a bit and I received my leavers school report. In it my " Achievements" were noted as member of various House and School teams but my crowning glory was that it seems I was  "Captainm, School Softball".

 

 

 

Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

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