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Genuine untapped talent pool or gimmick?


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31 minutes ago, OriginalMrC said:

Absolute fantasty guys. 'Good athletes' from another sport do not a RL player make. 

Because RL has tried so hard to make it work before and failed?

Other sports can manage it. Without aim to burst a bubble, RL isn’t that special.

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8 minutes ago, Sports Prophet said:

Because RL has tried so hard to make it work before and failed?

Other sports can manage it. Without aim to burst a bubble, RL isn’t that special.

What sports have recruited players from other sports at the age of 18-22 and turned them into professional players? 

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17 minutes ago, OriginalMrC said:

What sports have recruited players from other sports at the age of 18-22 and turned them into professional players? 

Loads, mate, loads.

(It is not loads.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_players_who_have_converted_from_one_football_code_to_another

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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26 minutes ago, OriginalMrC said:

What sports have recruited players from other sports at the age of 18-22 and turned them into professional players? 

Rugby League, Rugby Union, Australian Rules, Soccer, Cricket, Cycling, Rowing, Motor Racing, Bobsleigh, Gridiron to name a few

Edited by Sports Prophet
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16 minutes ago, gingerjon said:

Most of these are from years ago too. I knew others would mention RU but even that has slowed to a drip because most RU players can't cut it in RL. Generally the only successful converts have grown up playing both codes.

American football is a million miles from RL in terms of skill sets. It's not even comparable. 

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42 minutes ago, OriginalMrC said:

What sports have recruited players from other sports at the age of 18-22 and turned them into professional players? 

Brian carney and mason cox.

wasnt jahream Bula a basketball player also?

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15 minutes ago, OriginalMrC said:

Generally the only successful converts have grown up playing both codes.

Indeed.

But, apparently, our hopes lie with athletes from a short burst sport where catching isn't even a requirement for most players on the squad.

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Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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2 hours ago, Big Picture said:

The bolded part is absolutely not true.

There are 69 elite college gridiron programs, and in NCAA division I each of those has 85 scholarship positions on their team.  Players' eligibility is four years, so on average 1/4 of those 85 either graduate or exhaust their eligibility every year.  69 x 85 x 1/4 = 1,466 players, enough to last the 32 NFL teams 43 rounds in the entry draft which is never more than 7 or 8 rounds.

The players who played the defensive positions I've identified as potential converts represent 9/23 of a team if we count the punters and kickers as a 23rd position, and 1,466 x 9/23 = 573 potential converts from the elite 69 schools who'll have nowhere to play if they don't make the NFL, the CFL or the new, last gasp spring league.  Then there are another 540 such players who leave the other 65 Football Bowl Subdivision programs each year on top of that, so 1,1113 former FBS players with good potential in RL and 80% or more of those won't have a better opportunity than RL can offer them.

A player like Michael Woolridge might well surprise you; as a former defensive back he'll probably be able to play wing without much difficulty and he could be comfortable at fullback too seeing that his entry at NFLDraftScout.com lists him as a safety which is the last line of defense on a gridiron team.  I won't be surprised if he makes it.

He certainly looked pretty handy in marshalling space as the last man and shunting players into touch - or out of bounds as they saw in the US!

Edited by StandOffHalf
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Slightly off topic but it would be pretty cool to see how some of the really big stars would go in Rugby League, talking about some of the big or quick QB's like Josh Allen, Lamar Jackson, or someone smaller and quick like Kyler Murray. Not to mention where your top RB's would fit in to a RL side.

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1 hour ago, The Blues Ox said:

Slightly off topic but it would be pretty cool to see how some of the really big stars would go in Rugby League, talking about some of the big or quick QB's like Josh Allen, Lamar Jackson, or someone smaller and quick like Kyler Murray. Not to mention where your top RB's would fit in to a RL side.

Every one of those guys would be a liability on defense which opponents would exploit,  they'd never last.

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2 hours ago, OriginalMrC said:

Most of these are from years ago too. I knew others would mention RU but even that has slowed to a drip because most RU players can't cut it in RL. Generally the only successful converts have grown up playing both codes.

Wrong, it's slowed to a drip because RL can't compete with the money or the stature of playing RU.

2 hours ago, OriginalMrC said:

American football is a million miles from RL in terms of skill sets. It's not even comparable. 

For gridiron offensive players that's true.  It's not true for defensive players though, their skills are very transferable.

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9 hours ago, Big Picture said:

Wrong, it's slowed to a drip because RL can't compete with the money or the stature of playing RU.

For gridiron offensive players that's true.  It's not true for defensive players though, their skills are very transferable.

The NRL is one of the biggest rugby competitions in the world. They could sign loads of RU players If they wanted. Sometimes they do but usually these are players who have some experience of RL. 

And I'm beating my head against a brick wall but American footballers have very few transferable skills for RL. If you think a defensive player will have the ball skills, know-how and tactical awareness to be able to play in the NRL then I don't know what to say. 

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On 09/06/2024 at 14:56, OriginalMrC said:

I don't know where this idea comes from that American footballers would make good rugby league players. Sure they can probably hit hard in a brainless way but there's no chance they will have the necessary skills to make it at the highest level. Literally a needle in a haystack scenario 

Their weakness would be that they're either attackers or defenders.

In Rugby League, you need to be both.

That said, they could learn.

"We'll sell you a seat .... but you'll only need the edge of it!"

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10 hours ago, Big Picture said:

Every one of those guys would be a liability on defense which opponents would exploit,  they'd never last.

Thats presuming they could not tackle. Allen especially is a big bloke who has no problem with contact but yeah that is something they would have to learn. Attack wise though I guess we could presume they would rip it up.

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1 hour ago, Griff said:

Their weakness would be that they're either attackers or defenders.

In Rugby League, you need to be both.

That said, they could learn.

I think defensive backs/corner backs would be the best position for a rugby league player. They know how to defend (Somewhat) but are also athletic and have experience running with the ball off interceptions.

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49 minutes ago, Gomersall said:

Can I get a bet in the LA Roosters to win the USARL title?

 

Pretty awesome development IMO. Such a big country that it only takes a small pick up in popularity to translate to many players/eye balls. A 20 year (minimum) strategy still no doubt though. 

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The full story in today`s telegraph:

Full story:


The Sydney Roosters are on a groundbreaking $500,000 mission to break into the United States market with their own team based out of Los Angeles from next year.

Billionaire Roosters chairman Nick Politis is leading the charge on the back of interest created from the Las Vegas double-header in March in a revolutionary initiative he hopes will provide the first proper pathway for gridiron players into the NRL.

Under the plan a Roosters West Coast Rugby League Academy will be established alongside a team to be known as the LA Roosters to compete in a six-team competition in California.

“This is one of the most exciting ventures our club has ever undertaken,” Politis said.

“We see this as an exciting long-term opportunity not just to grow and develop rugby league in America but to provide openings for tens of thousands of great athletes that don’t always make it in the NFL or college football.

“It is a serious investment into an area where no NRL club has ever been.

“Who knows what can be achieved in the long term. There is so much potential.

“We are incredibly optimistic as to the opportunities that exist to unearth future rugby league talent.”

Politis is rugby league’s greatest visionary, the first man in Australian sport way back in 1976 to become a jersey sponsor with his car company City Ford.

He now insists this latest venture into the world’s biggest sporting market will pay off.

The Roosters were blown away by the Las Vegas experience earlier this year and the vision of independent commission chairman Peter V’landys to create a permanent footprint in America.

The LA Roosters will be made up of part-time players in the Pacific Coast Rugby League competition.

Roosters CEO Joe Kelly says the long-term plan is to attract players from the college football system.

“There are one million college football players,” Kelly said, “Of those, 10,000 participate in the combine each year, 300 go to the draft and approximately 285 get drafted.

“This leaves thousands and thousands of extremely talented athletes that are looking for an alternative once they finish college.

“We will become a very attractive second option. And we will be on the ground looking for them.”

Kelly has been working alongside Politis on the plan for several months.

Their $500,000 comes from the Roosters Foundation, the club’s fundraising arm that is dedicated towards young player development in junior academies and pathways.

V’landys loves what the Roosters are trying to achieve.

The Roosters will be the back-of-shorts partner for both the men and women USA National Hawks teams and will also be the referees sponsor for the USARL domestic competition.

Another $50,000 will go into a development fund for other American clubs to support the growth of rugby league awareness and participation in their region.

“Our investment will hopefully accelerate growth and provide the governing body and the players with much needed financial support to create further awareness and interest in the game,” Kelly said.

“In turn we are confident participation numbers will grow in the US domestic market.

“This whole thing isn’t just about finding NRL players.”

The Roosters also see an opportunity to entice rugby union players across to league.

“There are conservatively 1.2 million rugby players in the US. They play in winter, league plays in summer so their seasons don’t cross over,” Kelly said.

“There is a great opportunity to work alongside rugby and see a transition of players to league in their off-season.”

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6 hours ago, OriginalMrC said:

The NRL is one of the biggest rugby competitions in the world. They could sign loads of RU players If they wanted. Sometimes they do but usually these are players who have some experience of RL. 

And I'm beating my head against a brick wall but American footballers have very few transferable skills for RL. If you think a defensive player will have the ball skills, know-how and tactical awareness to be able to play in the NRL then I don't know what to say. 

I didn't say the defensive players have those particular skills, I said they have the skills to play defense in RL.  They can be taught the offensive skills they need and develop both sets of skills playing up through the reserve grade just as other players do. 

I do agree that guys who played offense in gridiron will all be poor prospects.

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Somewhat related to this discussion, while the NRL Las Vegas event was certainly a success and had a huge feel good factor, the coverage it received in American media was quite minimal compared to the current T20 Cricket World Cup taking place here. I have seen a number of stories from major news organizations like CBS, NY Times, etc about the World Cup and the growth of cricket in the USA. Rugby League should certainly target the US market, but it does need to realize it doesn't have anywhere near the money cricket has, and much of the cricket money is already in the USA due to the large numbers of immigrants from the West Indies and the subcontinent.

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5 minutes ago, eal said:

Somewhat related to this discussion, while the NRL Las Vegas event was certainly a success and had a huge feel good factor, the coverage it received in American media was quite minimal compared to the current T20 Cricket World Cup taking place here. I have seen a number of stories from major news organizations like CBS, NY Times, etc about the World Cup and the growth of cricket in the USA. Rugby League should certainly target the US market, but it does need to realize it doesn't have anywhere near the money cricket has, and much of the cricket money is already in the USA due to the large numbers of immigrants from the West Indies and the subcontinent.

Yet the BBC were asking people in NYC if they knew the T20 WC was taking place there and next to nobody had any idea.

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5 minutes ago, eal said:

Somewhat related to this discussion, while the NRL Las Vegas event was certainly a success and had a huge feel good factor, the coverage it received in American media was quite minimal compared to the current T20 Cricket World Cup taking place here. I have seen a number of stories from major news organizations like CBS, NY Times, etc about the World Cup and the growth of cricket in the USA. Rugby League should certainly target the US market, but it does need to realize it doesn't have anywhere near the money cricket has, and much of the cricket money is already in the USA due to the large numbers of immigrants from the West Indies and the subcontinent.

Isn’t major league cricket funded largely by Indian money?

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1 minute ago, Gomersall said:

Yet the BBC were asking people in NYC if they knew the T20 WC was taking place there and next to nobody had any idea.

The U.S. is a huge country populated by hundreds of millions of people who for the large part couldn’t tell you what’s going on in the next state never mind tell you anything about a sports tournament that’s totally alien to them.

I can remember something similar when USA 94’ was going on and Ireland were playing Italy in New York and the overwhelming majority of New Yorkers were totally oblivious to the game.

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