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roughyed1064

undefeated.

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Loose or lose? Loose vs. Lose. Lose is a verb that means “to fail to win, to misplace, or to free oneself from something or someone.” Loose is an adjective that means “not tight.”  Jeez where is the grammar police when you need them haha

:)

Edited by roughyed34

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38 minutes ago, roughyed34 said:

Loose or lose? Loose vs. Lose. Lose is a verb that means “to fail to win, to misplace, or to free oneself from something or someone.” Loose is an adjective that means “not tight.”  Jeez where is the grammar police when you need them haha

:)

Or even "where are the grammar police" :onthequiet:

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Sorry!! Typing as I speak there, that's a night in the cells for me being British lol :)

"I believe this is one of the differences between British and American English. One uses "are" more commonly and the other prefers "is". Therefore, I believe both are correct."

Haha who would have thought the Greatest game could provoke an intellectual discussion :):)

 

 

 

Edited by roughyed34
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4 hours ago, roughyed34 said:

Sorry!! Typing as I speak there, that's a night in the cells for me being British lol :)

"I believe this is one of the differences between British and American English. One uses "are" more commonly and the other prefers "is". Therefore, I believe both are correct."

Haha who would have thought the Greatest game could provoke an intellectual discussion :):)

 

 

 

Tsk Tsk.  Capitalising 'Greatest ' when it's neither a noun or at the beginning of a sentence. Sorry not sure if I should've written 'nor'. 

 

Edited by The Art of Hand and Foot

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5 hours ago, Les Tonks Sidestep said:

Or even "where are the grammar police" :onthequiet:

The grammar police is a collective noun, a group of people making up a single entity.   In American English, collective nouns take is. In British English, collective nouns can take is or are.

So "where is the grammar police" is ok by me.  Innit.

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11 hours ago, Dave Naylor said:

The grammar police is a collective noun, a group of people making up a single entity.   In American English, collective nouns take is. In British English, collective nouns can take is or are.

So "where is the grammar police" is ok by me.  Innit.

 

16 hours ago, roughyed34 said:

Sorry!! Typing as I speak there, that's a night in the cells for me being British lol :)

"I believe this is one of the differences between British and American English. One uses "are" more commonly and the other prefers "is". Therefore, I believe both are correct."

Haha who would have thought the Greatest game could provoke an intellectual discussion :):)

 

 

 

We're not in America and even if we were the use of 'is' is still grammatically incorrect.

From the Oxford Dictionary on the use of collective nouns:

If you look up police in our online dictionary, you’ll see that it bears the information ‘treated as plural’.

Returning to the police example at the start of this piece, Oxford’s two-billion word database of 21st century English, the Oxford English Corpus, contains a fair proportion of examples of police being used with a singular verb in reputable sources such as the Daily Telegraph, the Guardian, and the Boston Globe. It seems that a sea change may be under way. Although still considered ungrammatical according to standard British and American usage, are we seeing the gradual process in which police falls into line with other collective nouns and it becomes acceptable to use it with a singular verb?

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Without seeing the quoted example it's difficult to comment.  I think there's a difference here though.  Let's say there's a line of police officers.  You could say "look at the police over there".  There's an implied plural so you could say "where are the police standing".  

The Police however is a single entity when describing the force as a whole.  

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It was strange knowing I was not going to end Sunday on a high or low.However listening to Salford on the radio got me back on it. Especially that 40 20 late on when they spilled it at the tap. Straight out of the Oldham top drawer of frustration. 

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I don't know if any of you watched York v Toronto, York had a twenty year old scrum halve called liam harris  on loan from hull.k.r he destroyed Toronto. he attacked their line time and time again scoring two tries himself sending the York forwards through gaps and bringing their backs into play saving players energy . to mr. Naylor that's how a good scrum halve plays if we had played York yesterday we would have got battered if we do go down it is going to be a very long way back you will be going to matches in electric cars. score York 26 - Toronto 16

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Yes he was brilliant, on the whole York worked as a solid team and the referee was strong enough to stand up to Toronto and all their whinging tactics.

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On 7/31/2017 at 10:24 AM, Dave Naylor said:

Without seeing the quoted example it's difficult to comment.  I think there's a difference here though.  Let's say there's a line of police officers.  You could say "look at the police over there".  There's an implied plural so you could say "where are the police standing".  

The Police however is a single entity when describing the force as a whole.  

I dont know where you have been in Oldham lately Dave but on my travels around the borough i havent seen ANY line of police officers anywhere let alone the police officer over there ???  :scout:. . . .lol


20447_346989162151_776477151_4748963_7475038_s.jpg

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On 8/2/2017 at 6:29 PM, tandle said:

hi roger do you know what the attendance was.

think it was 2,600 . . . not likely to play then next year unless theres a big improvement in the defence


20447_346989162151_776477151_4748963_7475038_s.jpg

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1 hour ago, Roughyedz said:

I dont know where you have been in Oldham lately Dave but on my travels around the borough i havent seen ANY line of police officers anywhere let alone the police officer over there ???  :scout:. . . .lol

Errrrrr.  OK.

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