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Butchering the English language


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I'm attending a Leeds City Council focus group next week and they've emailed to ask me to do some "pre-preparation" for it. I'm tempted to reply and ask them to send it again, but in English next time. Surely the 'pre' bit of preparation is enough of a clue?

I always squirm a little when asked to 'pre-order' something (surely I'm just ordering it?) but this is a new low.

"Going forward" is another pet hate. Oh and passed instead of past; loose instead of lose; try's instead of tries.

Anyone got any other examples of 21st century gibberish? And anyone who replies with "THIS" will be hunted down and made to watch 100 Eamonn McManus interviews.

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And the winner is....should of. ?

My head literally exploded reading this thread.

Of course he's ashamed of me. He's a nearly teen and I'm his parent.

Pre-order is okay by me, as it is a succinct term for a particular kind of transaction.

Now I'll make way for Graveyard Johnny to moan about everything since the Great Vowel Shift.

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"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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27 minutes ago, fatboystu said:

People who say axe instead of ask......i want to axe a question ????

it almost sounds closer to 'axed', and yes that riles me too!

people who use the word blatantly and infinitely incorrectly, the latter often in relation to a design that by definition means there are actual limitations designed into the product.

 

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This could go on for ever . The rise of gibberish , made up words and phrases that catch on  , and general over clever nonsense is seemingly unstoppable . My bin man is now called a refuse operative . Why are politicians always wanting to” ring fence “ stuff and looking for “ bandwidth “ to discuss issues . Eh ? I’ll stay off the territory of  how people talk though , which if anyone has been up this way , will be for obvious reasons 

Edited by DavidM
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Double negatives. Especially when someone uses one but does not understand their mistake when i point it out to them. Someone may say something like, "i haven't got nothing mate!" and I will say, "so you do have something?" and they will just offer me a gormless look in reply. 

Edited by The Hallucinating Goose
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21 minutes ago, fatboystu said:

People, especially sports coaches or players who, when asked a question start the answer with "yeah, no"

Reporter - "charlie big bananas had a good game today?"

Coach - "yeah, no he's been training hard.....etc etc"

 

My shoulders are tensed.  Why would you say yeah, no?  But I know they do.......arrrrgh!!!

In the blink of an eye it could all be taken away.  Be grateful always.

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3 hours ago, Farmduck said:

My head literally exploded reading this thread.

Nick Clegg infamously talked about “ people who are literally in a different galaxy “ in a speech about the tax some wealthy people pay 

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1 minute ago, JonM said:

Ask pronounced as 'aks' was used by Chaucer and is in the first English translation of the bible.

Yeh but his spelling was absolutely rubbish and hardly anyone could read then so you could write in any old way ,so you’d think we’d progressed 

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Got a northern accent?

Everyone nodding along to these kind of threads thinks you pronounce everything incorrectly and talk funny.

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Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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6 minutes ago, gingerjon said:

Got a northern accent?

Everyone nodding along to these kind of threads thinks you pronounce everything incorrectly and talk funny.

But everyone up here thinks people down south pronounce words incorrectly and for some bizarre reason keep wanting to put an ‘ r ‘ in words where there isn’t one . The grarrs and the barrth. I even met a guy who’d been to Damarrscus on holiday 

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8 minutes ago, DavidM said:

Yeh but his spelling was absolutely rubbish and hardly anyone could read then so you could write in any old way ,so you’d think we’d progressed 

It's because aks was the original Anglo-Saxon form and it changed to ask sometime around the 17th century. Southern US and Caribbean English speakers have preserved the old form.

There's probably old blokes in Leigh sat round moaning about this modern trend for saying 'you' instead of using 'thee' and 'thou' properly.

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