Jump to content

Book thread: what are you reading?


Recommended Posts

On 08/07/2021 at 12:45, The Hallucinating Goose said:

The search is going well! Got 4 more of the series today. I have the first 3 as well now so will start reading as soon as I've finished the book I've just started. Very excited to get going! 

Post Captain sounds particularly intriguing, Aubrey and Maturin on the run in France with some debters and the Napoleonic regime hunting him. 

Also, interesting to see that in The Far side of the World it is actually an American ship they are pursuing rather than French privateers. I guess they changed this for the visual media version (see, didn't say the word I'm not allowed to mention) to try to appeal to the American market, after all Americans can't be portrayed as the bad guys in visual media. 

If like me you can’t find a used copy of one of the books PM me and I’ll gladly put it in the post for you.

The 13th book, aptly titled The Thirteen Gun Salute eluded me for years. I eventually ended up with two copies both bought on the same day. I found one in a Sue Ryder charity shop and Mrs Moose , fed up of hearing me moaning that I couldn’t find a copy had also bought me it online.🤷‍♂️ It was delivered later the same day.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Finished The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (the presenter from Pointless).

It made for a great holiday read and an enjoyable romp with a few thoughtful things to say about getting old.

Read it not a moment too soon either as the sequel book is coming out in a few months.

 

Edited by Gerrumonside ref
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just about to start Warrior of Rome- Fire in the east by Harry Sidebottom comes highly recommended by someone I trust . A totally different book I've just finished is We are the Clash,as good a music book that I've read covering the final much maligned album and the events of the mid eighties at home and abroad 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At the weekend, while rearranging my bookcase, I realised I had never got around to reading The Last Hero, by Sir Terry Pratchett. So I started it yesterday, probably the only book of his I haven't read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Arthur Conan Doyle - The Story of Spedegue's Dropper. 

A short cricketing tale that the author had published in The Strand in 1928. Gently humorous and more than a little absurd. However, some of what the Australian captain says oddly prefigure real comments made during the Bodyline series, which was five years later.

Full text here: https://www.arthur-conan-doyle.com/index.php?title=The_Story_of_Spedegue's_Dropper 

  • Thanks 1

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not reading it as I haven't got it yet, nor is it for me but I've just bought a birthday present for my OH. It's a book about the early years of the Sisters of Mercy and their initial success, which is her favourite era of her favourite band. It's called 'Waiting For Another War' and it cost me £45 + £5 postage. I need a lie down.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Johnoco said:

Not reading it as I haven't got it yet, nor is it for me but I've just bought a birthday present for my OH. It's a book about the early years of the Sisters of Mercy and their initial success, which is her favourite era of her favourite band. It's called 'Waiting For Another War' and it cost me £45 + £5 postage. I need a lie down.....

Well at least you don't have any world cup tickets to buy this year... 😕

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Johnoco said:

He's with Shergar and Elvis in Bradford somewhere.

They're all hiding out with Warrington's "year".

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 18/07/2021 at 23:03, The Hallucinating Goose said:

I've finished reading Master and Commander. Absolutely brilliant. Wow.

Onwards to Post Captain now! 

That's Post Captain finished now. Not quite as good as Master and Commander, I thought it dragged a bit, the pace was a bit slow in the first half when Aubrey and Maturin were on land. I wasn't expecting the first 200 or so pages to essentially be a romantic costume drama and it didn't really keep my attention. Really picked up once they were back on ships though! 

So, on to HMS Surprise now and I hope I don't read that one too quick because I have yet to come across to following two books in the series during my search and I'm hoping I don't have to give into the easy option that is just buying them on Amazon!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Been a bit of a while since I've given an update on my progress through the Aubrey-Maturin series. There's only two I need to find now before I've got the whole set. I might just take the easy option and buy them off amazon though they are numbers 15 and 20 so I've got ages to go before I need either of them. I've read the first 4 now. Would have read more but been a bit busy recently. So number 5 next, Desolation Island. 

I think the thing I'm finding so captivating about them is how well developed the characters are and how they are so seemlessly slipped into real life events. I'm finding out so much about the Napoleonic Wars by reading these stories because something I didn't realise before starting to read them was how most of the battles and actions that take place in the novels were real life events even down to the random small skirmishes that take place let alone the massive campaigns. I knew nothing of the Mauritius campaign before reading The Mauritius Command but it enticed me to look into it further and it was fascinating. What makes the books even more glorious is the detail O'Brien goes into when describing the events and moulding the characters into them and evidently just how much research he must have done to get every detail right. The work that has been put into constructing these books is just earth shattering. 

Edited by The Hallucinating Goose
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I'm reading a few of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe whodunnits. I have been a fan of the TV adaptation (see below) for some time, but have only just taken the plunge with the books.

 

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

A short story by Peter Watts called The Things.

It is John Carpenter's The Thing, but written from the monster's viewpoint: ttps://clarkesworldmagazine.com/watts_01_10/

  • Like 1

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I switch on my computer it takes a couple of minutes to load so I usually grab a book off the bookshelf, open at a random page and have a quick read of a few pages.  Currently the book I am grabbing at the moment is ‘Unreliable Memoirs’ by Clive James.  I must have bought the book thirty years ago and read it a few times but it still amuses me.  Clive even speaks warmly about one of his older peers at school the great Reg Gasnier.

P.S. is the reason the computer is a bit slow is because I am still on Microsoft 7?

P.P.S Strewth I just googled ‘Unreliable Memoirs’ to find it was the first of a trilogy of books.  How did I miss that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, marklaspalmas said:

Hi THG. Just started Fortunes of War, I think we're neck-and-neck.......

Yep, I'm about 60 pages into it at the moment, Maturin is currently trying to stop the boys on La Fleche from playing with his specimens. If I remember rightly they were playing tug of war with a seal skin! 😂

I took a break from the series to read Rob Burrow's autobiography and no doubt you'll overtake me very soon because I'm not a fast reader and I only read for about an hour a day anyway. Tell you what though, taking a break from the series really made me realise how much I am loving these books because I was so keen to get back to it after a 2 week break. 👍

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

Yep, I'm about 60 pages into it at the moment, Maturin is currently trying to stop the boys on La Fleche from playing with his specimens. If I remember rightly they were playing tug of war with a seal skin! 😂

I took a break from the series to read Rob Burrow's autobiography and no doubt you'll overtake me very soon because I'm not a fast reader and I only read for about an hour a day anyway. Tell you what though, taking a break from the series really made me realise how much I am loving these books because I was so keen to get back to it after a 2 week break. 👍

Great stuff mate! I think I read that very scene last night. I'm not voracious reader and I'm mixing up the O'Brians with some Magnus Mills and a bit of RL.

I am getting so much more out of this series the second time round. I love home much language we have in daily English today that comes from nautical terms. I don't mind admitting I get lost with some of the tehnical vocab, especially in battle scenes, but what an incredible body of work. Fascinating reading.

I have his biography of Picasso too which I will read some day.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to Audible, I have now 'read' Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone.

I hadn't realised quite how 'progressive' the novel would seem - albeit with a fair bit of casual orientalism/racism for a key aspect of the story - and also just how funny it would be in parts. The censorious Miss Clack ("that rampant spinster") is a particular highlight. It takes about 14 hours to get through the audio and it fairly flies by. Not sure I'd be able to 'read' it properly but that says more about me than it.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A.G.MacDonell - England, their England. An affectionately satirical overview of English people of the 1920s, ostensibly observed by a naive young Scotsman. Gently funny and very well-written.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...