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Annoying RL phrases


Moscow01
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On 01/10/2022 at 12:08, Chalky said:

Not really annoying phrases that wind me up but commentators’ inability to speak properly. In particular the pronunciation of the letter t or th.

Terry O’Connor, apart from not knowing the difference between “as well” and “either”, constantly seems to recall incidents from two fousand and firteen, and highlights certain players as frets on the field.

I just can’t listen to the commentator on Radio Manchester because he is always referring to the action being on the twenny, thirdy  or fordy meeder line or the cender of the field. Now the guy on channel 4 has started doing it too, Mark Wilson?

If these are because of speech defects I hold my hands up and apologise and sympathise but if they are just lazy affectations please star speaking properly.

Kindred spirit. Speak with a strong accent missen. Grates when people don't pronounce th. 

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Scrum-half, stand-off, hooker, lock, second-row, sheds, left-edge back-rower, right-edge back-rower, Pommie(when referring to non-English people), Muh-rownz, 40/20, it's a large field this one(they all should be at least 114m x 68m). 

Sea Eagles

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"Professional clubs"

When talking about teams who are not even remotely professional, train a couple of nights a week, and play in front of a couple of hundred people. 

What other sport does this?? It would be like saying albion rovers are a professional football team 😄

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"They couldn`t organize a ####-up in a brewery"

This phrase is a favourite means of bemoaning the latest administrative debacle. It`s coarse and ubiquitous. And just a metaphor. Everyone recognizes this is the one thing our administrators could organize. Probably with some aplomb.

We need a replacement. Something unique to RL.

How often at the start of a game do we discover that there is no ball and/or no kicking tee? Same applies after a try has been scored and conversion attempted. Happens again... and again... and again... and again. Even in high-profile matches.

Particularly amusing to watch the entourage on the touchline. They can see there is no ball and/or no kicking tee. But still they stand there, arms folded, waiting for a kick-off. Only when people in the middle start hollering or making oval shapes with their hands does it dawn that unless someone in the vicinity finds a ball and/or a kicking tee there will not be a kick-off.

Eventually, the RFL will hire management consultants to sort out the problem. Dispassionate experts who can reimagine the kick-off. Until then we have a perfect idiom to convey both literal truth and metaphorical despair. One we can give to others frustrated by incompetence in sport, business, public bodies, political parties -

"They couldn`t organize a kick-off at a Rugby League game"

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On 01/10/2022 at 12:08, Chalky said:

Not really annoying phrases that wind me up but commentators’ inability to speak properly. In particular the pronunciation of the letter t or th.

Terry O’Connor, apart from not knowing the difference between “as well” and “either”, constantly seems to recall incidents from two fousand and firteen, and highlights certain players as frets on the field.

I just can’t listen to the commentator on Radio Manchester because he is always referring to the action being on the twenny, thirdy  or fordy meeder line or the cender of the field. Now the guy on channel 4 has started doing it too, Mark Wilson?

If these are because of speech defects I hold my hands up and apologise and sympathise but if they are just lazy affectations please star speaking properly.

Using the correct word's one thing but IMO nothing wrong with a regional accent on TV, especially in a regional sport. As long as people can understand what someone's saying, are we automatically grading accents now by saying the ones who abbreviate (not mispronounce/forget to say etc.) "t" and "th" are less worthy of appearing on TV?

I'm overplaying it slightly but for me if someone can be understood, what's the problem?

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I'm also not sure how we got to the point where the word 'ordinary' means poor.

i.e. "That was a very ordinary performance today".

I am sure that there are plenty of words to substitute with ordinary that would convey the desired message more appropriately.

It really is a very ordinary way of getting your point across (actually, I quite like it now I have used it).

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"The history of the world is the history of the triumph of the heartless over the mindless." — Sir Humphrey Appleby.

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The "clunky" world cup . Started early on by James Graham now everyone is at it. Although clunky does sum up much of the BBC coverage....

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When the pinch comes the common people will turn out to be more intelligent than the clever ones. I certainly hope so.

George Orwell
 
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You either own NFTs or women’s phone numbers but not both

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14 hours ago, Madrileño said:

"Professional clubs"

When talking about teams who are not even remotely professional, train a couple of nights a week, and play in front of a couple of hundred people. 

What other sport does this?? It would be like saying albion rovers are a professional football team 😄

If people get paid then they're professional, regardless of how good they are or how many watch them 👍

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