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On 3/2/2018 at 6:36 PM, Phil said:

As a agency user from both ends as it were I’d be interested in your take on this 

A few years ago now I was sent for an interview at a company in Silsden by an agency I was signed up with. It was a bit of a commute for me but I needed a job. 

Anyway the interview is going well, very well, in fact I’m smashing it until, 

“So what salary would you be looking for?”

”well for a position with these responsibilities I’d be looking for £X”

LONG silence from interviewers

”Oh we were really thinking in the region of £W”

”I”ll increase your cash flow by x%, I’ll decrease your bad debt by y% that alone will more than pay the difference between w and x. I’m worth it”

I didn’t get the job and the agency were massively displeased with me.

what do you think? 

I would say it totally depends on what you were told the salary range was pre interview - in a lot of companies if the pay is £x-y it does not matter if you could double their income as that range was set by someone else and it is outside the power of that manager to change it. In some cases where it is a larger company their maybe worldwide salary structures with rigid boundaries, in others it may just be a finance director has drawn a line in the sand. But making the interviewing manager look small by pointing out where his authority ends is never a good move so might be best to have started with "i was told the range was £x-y but as I can bring in a doubling of turnover what is the chance of moving that to £z or even a contractual obligation of a rise to that after probation if I have hit mutually agree targets - that would certainly allow you to gauge the likelihood of future pay rises as well

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My company is recruiting apprentices.  Places across the country.  

https://www1.pds-group.co.uk/arqiva/

(there is a refer a friend scheme so I can earn money by recruiting someone... :tongue:)

Edited by Bedford Roughyed

With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

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I always try to give feedback wherever possible after I've interviewed someone, however I don't force it if the unsuccessful candidate doesn't want to hear it. The way that I frame any feedback is to start with what they answered well, especially where they've used good examples to demonstrate a certain skillset. I then suggest where I think they either struggled (which people often know themselves), and offer suggestions on what I was looking for in an answer in order to offer guidance for future reference.

Another thing I'd always encourage is to call the recruiting manager before applying, to find out more about the role and the organisation. That way, you can often find out more about the skills the recruiter is looking for, thus helping prepare an application/for interview, along with it being a good opportunity to try to establish whether it is actually the right role for you.

 

 

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2 hours ago, gazza77 said:

I always try to give feedback wherever possible after I've interviewed someone, however I don't force it if the unsuccessful candidate doesn't want to hear it. The way that I frame any feedback is to start with what they answered well, especially where they've used good examples to demonstrate a certain skillset. I then suggest where I think they either struggled (which people often know themselves), and offer suggestions on what I was looking for in an answer in order to offer guidance for future reference.

Another thing I'd always encourage is to call the recruiting manager before applying, to find out more about the role and the organisation. That way, you can often find out more about the skills the recruiter is looking for, thus helping prepare an application/for interview, along with it being a good opportunity to try to establish whether it is actually the right role for you.

 

 

That second paragraph is something that I was very surprised about when I joined the NHS, I've worked for a number of private companies where that sort of conduct would see you automatically disqualified for trying to influence the recruiter while it's encouraged, if not expected, in the NHS for jobs over a certain level.  I'd exercise caution with that for many companies, public sector it's an advantage, private sector it could be the reverse..

My second week in the job in the NHS, I had a candidate call me and I didn't expect it, she was really taken aback when I suggested I didn't want to talk prior to the interview, HR told me off for it when I asked.

For many NHS jobs Band 8D and above where you don't call ahead of time, you'd be as well not turning up for the interview.

And don't get me started on the NHS's seriously daft obsession with not asking performance related questions...

I had one candidate for an Account Manager position put in a formal complaint against me because I ran a scenario at the end of the interview where I had one of the interviewers play the part of an angry NHS senior exec to see how they'd handle being dropped into a typical tough situation.  Apparently he thought that was unfair pressure and not what he expected.

"When in deadly danger, when beset by doubt; run in little circles, wave your arms and shout"

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  • 4 weeks later...

2 weeks ago, Esther McVee MP suggested that school children should get part-time jobs to prepare themselves for real work when they leave school. I wrote to her suggesting she shuts her mouth until those of us over-50 have full or part time work, as we have bills to pay, and are not living off the Bank of Mum & Dad. I got a reply this morning suggesting that there are plenty of jobs available for the over 50's who want to work. I have drafted a reply to ask her if that is why I have only had one Interview in 2.5 years.

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6 hours ago, Bleep1673 said:

2 weeks ago, Esther McVee MP suggested that school children should get part-time jobs to prepare themselves for real work when they leave school. I wrote to her suggesting she shuts her mouth until those of us over-50 have full or part time work, as we have bills to pay, and are not living off the Bank of Mum & Dad. I got a reply this morning suggesting that there are plenty of jobs available for the over 50's who want to work. I have drafted a reply to ask her if that is why I have only had one Interview in 2.5 years.

There is not a finite number of jobs in the economy.

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4 hours ago, Shadow said:

Founder member of the UK Pedants society. 

Pedants, pedant's or pedants' ? 

Society of UK Pedants.

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“If you understand, things are just as they are; if you do not understand, things are just as they are.” Zen Proverb

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Officially started job hunting on Friday. Getting a few calls from recruiters. Hopefully some interviews will follow soon  

Absolutely detest interviews. Never walked in confident in 20 years, much prefer being the interviewer.

My least favourite interview was about 3 years ago where I had 5 x 40 minute interviews over the phone with various stakeholders, didn’t get the job as cocked up one question with the one who was going to be my line manager.

Obviously I’ve got a few right as this is the first time I’ve ever been without a job since starting full time work at 19

 

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30 minutes ago, Spidey said:

Officially started job hunting on Friday. Getting a few calls from recruiters. Hopefully some interviews will follow soon  

Absolutely detest interviews. Never walked in confident in 20 years, much prefer being the interviewer.

My least favourite interview was about 3 years ago where I had 5 x 40 minute interviews over the phone with various stakeholders, didn’t get the job as cocked up one question with the one who was going to be my line manager.

Obviously I’ve got a few right as this is the first time I’ve ever been without a job since starting full time work at 19

 

Good luck in the hunt!

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"When in deadly danger, when beset by doubt; run in little circles, wave your arms and shout"

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35 minutes ago, Spidey said:

Obviously I’ve got a few right as this is the first time I’ve ever been without a job since starting full time work at 19

Depends how old you are :tongue:

Good luck

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2 hours ago, Spidey said:

Officially started job hunting on Friday. Getting a few calls from recruiters. Hopefully some interviews will follow soon  

Absolutely detest interviews. Never walked in confident in 20 years, much prefer being the interviewer.

My least favourite interview was about 3 years ago where I had 5 x 40 minute interviews over the phone with various stakeholders, didn’t get the job as cocked up one question with the one who was going to be my line manager.

Obviously I’ve got a few right as this is the first time I’ve ever been without a job since starting full time work at 19

 

The last interview I had, I totally messed up on a question which was, "What achievement are you most proud of during your career?" It floored me for two reasons. First, I have never liked blowing my own trumpet - I was brought up to consider pride as a sin, or at least, not a nice thing. Second and most important, I had not prepared for the interview. After it, I checked the TES online and the first piece of advice was to think of something you have done and of which you are proud. Talk about kicking yourself!

So, my advice for your interview is to prepare. Use relevant online advice and try to anticipate questions.

(I'm sure you've done this, but I offer it just in case.)

PS. Good luck.

Rethymno Rugby League Appreciation Society

Founder (and, so far, only) member.

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I would add to that - if you have a job description and it mentions certain competencies (such as "Extensive experience in a customer-focused role in a service oriented environment") make sure you have some relevant examples ready to real out to provide proof (ie in that case an example of when you have had to deal with a difficult / irate customer and left them feeling happy without costing your company loads)

 

You can usually guess a lot of the question from the spec if you have a decent one provided

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Some years, I did hundreds of interviews (hiring a lot of new graduates.) Pretty much all the technical questions I used ended up on Glassdoor and similar websites. The kind of people I'm looking for are the kind of people that will look on Glassdoor and make the effort to prepare for the kinds of things I'm going to ask. Ssoutherner has it spot on.

Good luck Spidey.

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A number of NHS organisations have gone to generic job descriptions with an add-on bit that’s kept as conceptual as possible. You have a significant number of roles where the JD has barely been wafted over the actual job’s responsibilities. Idiot ideas that make getting the right people in for the role very difficult. 

"When in deadly danger, when beset by doubt; run in little circles, wave your arms and shout"

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18 hours ago, ckn said:

Imagine this scenario, you're having a seriously bad week after a catastrophic update of your bank's IT software and then someone shows you your job has just been advertised on LinkedIn as vacant.

Some more on that from The Register.

:D

I'd have thought that they'd be looking for a new test manager; a classic case of inadequate V&P testing.

"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

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7 minutes ago, Griff9of13 said:

:D

I'd have thought that they'd be looking for a new test manager; a classic case of inadequate V&P testing.

In times of financial trouble, people cut "luxuries" like test teams.  It's a massive false economy cutting back on testing.  If they've cut testing, they've more than likely cut requirements gathering.  When I took over my job in the NHS, the projects team had zero requirements specs, not a single one I could use to gauge quality.  If they've no requirements specs than you know there are no test plans.  You'd think I was asking them to self-flagellate when I asked them to at least start documenting basic requirements to prove they'd done SOME analysis of what was really needed.

I know a few folk in the banking IT industry and I wouldn't do it.  The banking problems of 2008 onwards saw IT and back-office folk take the absolute brunt of the cuts to the bank, after all why get rid of a banker friend when you can get rid of an anonymous IT worker.

"When in deadly danger, when beset by doubt; run in little circles, wave your arms and shout"

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2 hours ago, ckn said:

I know a few folk in the banking IT industry and I wouldn't do it.  The banking problems of 2008 onwards saw IT and back-office folk take the absolute brunt of the cuts to the bank, after all why get rid of a banker friend when you can get rid of an anonymous IT worker.

And now they wonder why banking IT failures are so common. :fie:

 

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"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

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First interview done. Bit of a wait to find out results as interviewing until next Friday

Was quite a relaxed affair, first time I’ve not worn my suit to an interview after reading this:

“We’re straight-talkers here, not corporate wafflers. We turn up for work in trainers and t-shirts, not suits and ties. And we’re not afraid to do things differently. Especially if it means doing things better.”

Glad I did, made me more relaxed and certainly didn’t stand out in their office walking through like I’ve felt at other places

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Came across this thread by chance as don't come on AOB, but found it really interesting so thanks for all the contributions. Having been with the same company since graduation in 2006, in various different guises and roles, I'm now for the first time seriously looking at leaving. I still enjoy my role, the autonomy, got a good boss (often makes a big difference), all reasons that have put me off looking previously (the grass isn't always greener). However, I feel i'm becoming a bit stagnant and need a new challenge. 2 of my friends who joined at a similar time are now directors of other companies (albeit much smaller ones), and I feel i should be further on with my development when I look at them and others internally. The division that i'm currently in, which i helped start up in 2009, now returns in excess of £1 million PBIT annually for only 6 direct employees. The company has bought an aviation business in Denmark and i hoped they would integrate, giving me a wider European role, but that doesn't appear forthcoming as they're looking to continue the businesses separately for the time being, which doesn't leave me much progression in aviation and i don't want to move divisions as none of the others interest me. If I leave though, they will likely come back calling for me if anything does materialise that way, as they know my value and it's such a specialist industry.

So first time i've properly looked, I had a recruitment agent (one of many) reach out to me on linkedin and coincidentally he has a role for me that would suit me. They're had a number of candidates at 1st and 2nd interview stage but not found the right one. I'm frantically bringing my CV upto speed (whilst battling man flu) to try and get their interest. I'm genuinely excited (I'm sure it will wear off!)

Think i will have to navigate the minefield of other recruitment agents to find some good ones and look on Reed? or whatever online. I'll search some major local employers websites too as i know more companies are going down this route too.

Thanks for the tips and sorry for the long post

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