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Tremendous figures (as always) but almost all figures down on 2018 so let's hope that trend is reversed in 2020.

Interesting to see that all of the 5 top rated games involved Brisbane, add in their attendances and it shows that they are a massive club.

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Kayo was released last year (Fox's streaming service) and has probably shifted quite a few viewers. Not to mention the people like myself who almost exclusively watch on the NRL app.

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19 minutes ago, Dunbar said:

Tremendous figures (as always) but almost all figures down on 2018 so let's hope that trend is reversed in 2020.

Interesting to see that all of the 5 top rated games involved Brisbane, add in their attendances and it shows that they are a massive club.

Was there any doubt about that? Always the best supported team. 
 

The women’s games’ viewing figures are phenomenal. 

Edited by Eddie

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50 minutes ago, Dunbar said:

Tremendous figures (as always) but almost all figures down on 2018 so let's hope that trend is reversed in 2020.

Interesting to see that all of the 5 top rated games involved Brisbane, add in their attendances and it shows that they are a massive club.

Most would accept that the style of play in the NRL is pretty tight and risk-averse, resulting in games that have English media and fans reaching for words like  "dour". These types of games, with appropriate coverage, work well as TV events, probably less well as spectator events. It would be interesting to see whether viewing figures would rise or fall if playing styles were loosened up and games opened out, in the way our administrators have always been obsessed with. On the subject of the Broncos, with a second Brisbane club a hot topic currently, there`s surely great value in having a Man Utd of the NRL. A club of that size, can have a global reach to the benefit of the game overall.

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16 minutes ago, unapologetic pedant said:

Most would accept that the style of play in the NRL is pretty tight and risk-averse, resulting in games that have English media and fans reaching for words like  "dour". These types of games, with appropriate coverage, work well as TV events, probably less well as spectator events. It would be interesting to see whether viewing figures would rise or fall if playing styles were loosened up and games opened out, in the way our administrators have always been obsessed with. On the subject of the Broncos, with a second Brisbane club a hot topic currently, there`s surely great value in having a Man Utd of the NRL. A club of that size, can have a global reach to the benefit of the game overall.

Do you actually watch the NRL?

It is not dour at all.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Allora
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Talent is secondary to whether players are confident.

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11 minutes ago, unapologetic pedant said:

Most would accept that the style of play in the NRL is pretty tight and risk-averse, resulting in games that have English media and fans reaching for words like  "dour".

If I were asked to describe the NRL in one sentence I would say the exact opposite of this.

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13 minutes ago, Allora said:

Do you watch the NRL?

It is not dour at all.

I couldn`t agree more. I`ve always seen tight, strategic contests as more exciting. But I`m conscious of being in a minority. Our media generally judge a game by the number of points scored. Low-scoring equals boring, high-scoring equals entertaining. The NRL proves otherwise.

Edited by unapologetic pedant
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1 hour ago, Dunbar said:

Tremendous figures (as always) but almost all figures down on 2018 so let's hope that trend is reversed in 2020.

Interesting to see that all of the 5 top rated games involved Brisbane, add in their attendances and it shows that they are a massive club.

The author of the article admitted he didn't have access to all the figures, so we'd need those to see if numbers are really down, or if viewers are just migrating to new platforms.

Edited by Futtocks
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"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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13 minutes ago, unapologetic pedant said:

I couldn`t agree more. I`ve always seen tight, strategic contests as more exciting. But I`m conscious of being in a minority. Our media generally judge a game by the number of points scored. Low-scoring equals boring, high-scoring equals entertaining. The NRL proves otherwise.

Super League is entertaining at times but much of that comes from loose and poor defense and poor basic skills.


Talent is secondary to whether players are confident.

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30 minutes ago, unapologetic pedant said:

Most would accept that the style of play in the NRL is pretty tight and risk-averse, resulting in games that have English media and fans reaching for words like  "dour".

Dour!!! You needs your bumps felt. 

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The NRL isn't 'tighter and more strategic' though.  The average tries scored per team per match in 2019 in the Super League was 3.9 while in the NRL it was 3.3. 

In offloads (often seen as a metric for expansive play) the Super League saw 10.1 offloads per team per game while in the NRL it was 9.8.

This idea that the Super League is full of attack minded teams and the NRL risk averse conservative play is a myth.

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4 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

The author of the article admitted he didn't have access to all the figures, so we'd need those to see if numbers are really down, or if viewers are just migrating to new platforms.

Yes, that's a fair point (also made by Pulga)

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8 minutes ago, Allora said:

Super League is entertaining at times but much of that comes from loose and poor defense and poor basic skills.

I think there is a lot to be said for this.

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5 minutes ago, Dunbar said:

This idea that the Super League is full of attack minded teams and the NRL risk averse conservative play is a myth.

It is one of the things that get repeated every year, regardless of facts, along with "this is the weakest Kangaroos side in decades".

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"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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4 minutes ago, Dunbar said:

The NRL isn't 'tighter and more strategic' though.  The average tries scored per team per match in 2019 in the Super League was 3.9 while in the NRL it was 3.3. 

In offloads (often seen as a metric for expansive play) the Super League saw 10.1 offloads per team per game while in the NRL it was 9.8.

This idea that the Super League is full of attack minded teams and the NRL risk averse conservative play is a myth.

Some posters seem to be disagreeing with me when I`m in full agreement with them, if that makes sense. My first post was about the perception of the NRL in this country not the reality. Back in the eighties, we were fed propaganda that the Winfield Cup was less exciting to watch than our comp, partly to assuage our grief over the defeats of 82, 84, 86. When you actually got to see Winfield Cup games you realised what wishful thinking this all was.

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2 hours ago, Dunbar said:

The NRL isn't 'tighter and more strategic' though.  The average tries scored per team per match in 2019 in the Super League was 3.9 while in the NRL it was 3.3. 

In offloads (often seen as a metric for expansive play) the Super League saw 10.1 offloads per team per game while in the NRL it was 9.8.

This idea that the Super League is full of attack minded teams and the NRL risk averse conservative play is a myth.

On the subject of offloads does anyone agree that tackles are too often prematurely called complete above ground? A ball-carrier can sometimes pop a pass out the back in response to losing ground, but the ref has to let the contest develop. Some refs are yelling "HELD"  half a second after contact, it`s like HELD Tourettes, just part of the general patter by which they control the game. The defenders always go on with the tackle, as they`re entitled to having won the contact, so the only effect of the call is to stop the ball-carrier from even thinking of passing. A number of Aussie refs these days start out in Touch Football, is this a factor?

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Super League in the 2000s was more exciting than the current NRL in terms of attacking extravagance and entertainment, albeit with poor defence and less competitive matches.

However, the entertainment value of Super League has dropped off the scale in the last 5-6 years.   I accept we are picking from a much smaller talent pool but it seems the players coming through are very generic in in their style and coached ability.   It’s says a lot when the most exciting thing we can talk about this week is Liam Marshall’s off the cuff try against Hudds.    Didn’t we used to see that every week a few years back?

I know defences are now better, the league is tighter and we’ve run Australia closer in tests and finals etc.   I’m just not sure if that has been good for the UK game overall as we’ve lost our selling point as a ‘spectacle’.

Edited by Cheshire Setter
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On 01/03/2020 at 04:52, Dunbar said:

Tremendous figures (as always) but almost all figures down on 2018 so let's hope that trend is reversed in 2020.

Interesting to see that all of the 5 top rated games involved Brisbane, add in their attendances and it shows that they are a massive club.

No wonder the NRL is gung ho for a 17th team in Brisbane.

I still think that there should be an 18th in Perth, but the NRL probably thinks that there aren't enough players to make up two extra teams.

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On 01/03/2020 at 19:46, Dunbar said:

The NRL isn't 'tighter and more strategic' though.  The average tries scored per team per match in 2019 in the Super League was 3.9 while in the NRL it was 3.3. 

Before you take that statistic on face value, you should also be keen to see the average winning margins between the two leagues. It may present that statistic in a drastic new light.

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3 hours ago, Manfred Mann said:

No wonder the NRL is gung ho for a 17th team in Brisbane.

I still think that there should be an 18th in Perth, but the NRL probably thinks that there aren't enough players to make up two extra teams.

Conjuring up a fanbase for a second Brisbane NRL franchise might prove tricky. Not much can be read into the experience of the SQ Crushers since it got caught up in the SL war, but there was at least a distinction between the two in that they played in different stadia. Would a new franchise look to attract broncos fans, followers of Queensland Cup sides, or new people? How likely are any of these options in significant numbers? There was a campaign by the Brothers group backed by Confraternity RL to give a new SEQ franchise a strong identity. The appeal of a Perth franchise, based on geography, is straightforward, for anyone interested, or persuaded to be interested, in RL , this is their local team.

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1 hour ago, Sports Prophet said:

Before you take that statistic on face value, you should also be keen to see the average winning margins between the two leagues. It may present that statistic in a drastic new light.

It does not.

The average winning margin in Super League in 2019 was 16 points. The average winning margin in the NRL in 2019 was 14 points.

 

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The stats on the scorelines between the Super League and NRL are interesting. 

Average points per team per game

NRL = 20

Super League = 22

 

Average winning margin

NRL = 14

Super League = 16

 

Number of games with winning margin 4 points or fewer

NRL = 46 (out of 188 games) 24% of games

Super League= 39 (out of 174 games) 22% of games

 

Number of winning margins above 50 points 

NRL = 2

Super League = 2

 

The NRL and Super League are surprisingly similar in the scorelines

(NB: this is not a commentary on the quality of the two leagues)

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