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Sayings - Especially From The Past


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I would have thought on a rugby league forum website, the obvious one to quote is, when describing something (or somebody? not sure) that is very good as being "the best in the Northern Union".

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2 minutes ago, Wiltshire Warrior Dragon said:

I would have thought on a rugby league forum website, the obvious one to quote is, when describing something (or somebody? not sure) that is very good as being "the best in the Northern Union".

my grand dad, who played in the northern union used to say it to me when I was little. I felt ten feet tall. 

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I remember a spoof Yorkshire saying which was, "If it's raining on t' moor and there's sheep about, look out for wet sheep!"

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My mum's phrase (which I am sure has biblical roots as she is a devout Catholic) is 'this is neither fishing nor mending nets'.

I like the phrase.

"The history of the world is the history of the triumph of the heartless over the mindless." — Sir Humphrey Appleby.

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  • 2 weeks later...

She was done up like a fourpenny hambone.

Used in either of two senses:

 - she was wearing her best outfit

 - she was wearing an outfit that she hoped made her look posher than herself

 

Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police

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Wow, there are some fascinating sayings out there. I wonder why humans create sayings. Perhaps we don't have the vocabulary to fully express ourselves or maybe it's just a fun thing. 

My blog: https://rugbyl.blogspot.co.nz/

It takes wisdom to know when a discussion has run its course.

It takes reasonableness to end that discussion. 

 

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"Here they come, Rudge, Martin and Baker" 

This was a saying in West Cumberland when I was a lad that referred to any three people walking together that you saw.  My dad used it a lot if they saw three mates or family members together. I asked my dad what it meant and he said he hadn't a clue, but his dad and grandad said it, so he did as well.  Many years later, when reading a book on the hangmen of England I came across a chapter that struck home. Benjamin Rudge, John Martin and James Baker were three thugs from that there London, who, after murdering a policeman in Essex fled up to Cumberland and robbed Netherby Hall. In the following days they shot and wounded a further three policemen and murdered a fourth, all in Cumberland.  They were eventually caught after a chase on a train and were beaten by railway workers who helped the police arrest them. When convicted and sentenced to hang, a mob tried to break them out of Carlisle prison to lynch them. The three were hanged together at Carlisle in a very rare triple hanging. This was in 1885.

Jam Eater  1.(noun. jam eeter) A Resident of Whitehaven or Workington. Offensive.  It is now a term of abuse that both towns of West Cumbria use for each other especially at Workington/Whitehaven rugby league derby matches.

St Albans Centurions Website 

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Not old, but voiced in converations over several years by a friend of mine:

His pint of beer: There's more life in a tramp's vest.

A not particularly attractive lady:  got a face like a plasterer's radio.

 

 

Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police

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to young lads on site -you'll never make a joiner as long as you've got a hole in your ###### (other building trades are availale)

see you later undertaker - in a while necrophile 

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My mum, born befor the 1st world war, used to respond to "What's for tea, mum?" with "Wigwams for womskers for  ducks to peek on"

🤔🥴🤔🥴🤔🥴🤔

"Stay away from negative people. They have a problem for every solution."

Albert Einstein   (Fat chance on THIS forum)

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You look like you've lost a bob and f'un' a tanner - fun = found

se the, the's a marse - look! there is a mouse over there.

they've got a face like a bulldog chewing a wasp - Not very attractive

they've got a face like a slapped ###### - they look a bit down

Your mum would kill a willing 'oss - Your mum is very demanding, and would kill a willing horse with all these jobs she has lined up for me to do.

Well I'll go tet' foot of our stairs - I can't believe it!

I'll give you such a bloody once er - I'm going to hit you.

I'd rather drink turps and urinate on a bonfire - I'd rather not.

I wouldn't pay him in washers

I've got my nuts in a vice - I'm in a difficult situation

 

 

 

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It's a bit black over Bill's mothers....black clouds in the sky

Raining stair rods

It is yay big ( hold hands apart in the air)

Give it a thump ( something that isn't working)

Black as yer 'at

A slight inclination of the cranium is as adequate as the spasmodic movement of one optical covering to an equinine quadraped totally devoid of its optical senses.... A nods good as wink to a blind donkey.

You don't even know how many beans make 5 

 

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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