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7 minutes ago, Live after death said:

As long as Cumbria as existed, Barrow has been part of Cumbria. Now Cumberland is a different story. 

As a side issue HM one of my hobbies is studying the history of Celtic/Gaelic languages (Welsh/Cornish/Breton Celtic and Scottish/Irish/Manx Gaelic) I have been recently looking into the history of the only other one Cumbric which is extinct however many old words are still used in Cumbria today like YAN (One) Do you ever come across this ?

 

Paul 

 

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Town still do their bit from time to time  

Wow a merged West Cumbria club thread part 103. The finances are not in place Both grounds are in decay despite the ongoing efforts of the clubs. The player pool is usually stripped of

I know this isn't relevant to West Cumbria but would like Carlisle to restart.

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10 minutes ago, ATLANTISMAN said:

As a side issue HM one of my hobbies is studying the history of Celtic/Gaelic languages (Welsh/Cornish/Breton Celtic and Scottish/Irish/Manx Gaelic) I have been recently looking into the history of the only other one Cumbric which is extinct however many old words are still used in Cumbria today like YAN (One) Do you ever come across this ?

 

Paul 

 

Try visiting Maryport,they have their own language.

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31 minutes ago, ATLANTISMAN said:

As a side issue HM one of my hobbies is studying the history of Celtic/Gaelic languages (Welsh/Cornish/Breton Celtic and Scottish/Irish/Manx Gaelic) I have been recently looking into the history of the only other one Cumbric which is extinct however many old words are still used in Cumbria today like YAN (One) Do you ever come across this ?

 

Paul 

 

Yan is commonly used in West Cumbria to this day.

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36 minutes ago, Gerrumonside ref said:

Is that the place where they literally drink the sea?

Just when they’re drowning 

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2 hours ago, Mr Frisky said:

Yan is commonly used in West Cumbria to this day.

Really interesting I read that there is a group trying to revive the language, Cornish is starting to do really well and Manx also both due to a combination of school and music you tube etc the interesting thing about Cumbric is the amount of words still used by locals without even realising the connection that goes back to the 12th century.

 

Paul

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13 minutes ago, ATLANTISMAN said:

Really interesting I read that there is a group trying to revive the language, Cornish is starting to do really well and Manx also both due to a combination of school and music you tube etc the interesting thing about Cumbric is the amount of words still used by locals without even realising the connection that goes back to the 12th century.

 

Paul

Quite a few of these are still in common use depending on where you go in West Cumbria

https://www.lowneststudios.co.uk/cumbrian-dialect/

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9 minutes ago, ATLANTISMAN said:

Really interesting I read that there is a group trying to revive the language, Cornish is starting to do really well and Manx also both due to a combination of school and music you tube etc the interesting thing about Cumbric is the amount of words still used by locals without even realising the connection that goes back to the 12th century.

 

Paul

Cumbric, to use the modern term, doesn't have any written records as far as I am aware, which would be a barrier to effective revival.

tt's in the Brythonic branch of Gaelic, which means it is more closely aligned to Welsh, Cornish and Breton, rather than Irish, Scottish or Manx Gaelic. I was a liitle surprised at that thinking about Cumbria's proximity to Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Northern Ireland for that matter. I don't think that anyone really knows the geographical reach of Cumbric, but there are suggestions that it extended from Strathclyde to Lancashire, possibly even reaching Cheshire.

I'd be interested to know whether there are any compilations of words and phrases that have been identified as being associated with Cumbric.

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10 minutes ago, Manxmanc said:

Cumbric, to use the modern term, doesn't have any written records as far as I am aware, which would be a barrier to effective revival.

tt's in the Brythonic branch of Gaelic, which means it is more closely aligned to Welsh, Cornish and Breton, rather than Irish, Scottish or Manx Gaelic. I was a liitle surprised at that thinking about Cumbria's proximity to Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Northern Ireland for that matter. I don't think that anyone really knows the geographical reach of Cumbric, but there are suggestions that it extended from Strathclyde to Lancashire, possibly even reaching Cheshire.

I'd be interested to know whether there are any compilations of words and phrases that have been identified as being associated with Cumbric.

There are written examples but not many and not useful. Some margin notes on other books. The language was dead by the thirteenth century. Brythonic speaking areas - referred to in Welsh literature as Yr Hen Ogledd covered most of what is now the borders and Strathclyde. The earliest Welsh literature that has survived is about a "British" army setting out from Edinburgh to a battle in Catterick. They lost.

Glasgow and the areas around that were distinct Brythonic kingdoms within what is now Scotland until about the 12th century.

For the very obvious connection look at the word Cumbria and what the Welsh call their country: Cymru.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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16 hours ago, ATLANTISMAN said:

As a side issue HM one of my hobbies is studying the history of Celtic/Gaelic languages (Welsh/Cornish/Breton Celtic and Scottish/Irish/Manx Gaelic) I have been recently looking into the history of the only other one Cumbric which is extinct however many old words are still used in Cumbria today like YAN (One) Do you ever come across this ?

Paul 

I lived only five years in Cumbria, Paul.

Yan was in common use. Yance, as well. "Ah've bin ti Barra yance."

Other expressions used I hadn't heard before:

Tangles or lugs in hair were 'cotters'.

A clothes horse was, in fact, a clothes 'maiden'.

Somebody fooled or duped into accepting something had been 'codded'.

A bloke was often described as 'laddo', a woman 'lasso'.

'Ooz things?' was a conversation starter.

'Eh' punctuated speech as if it were a comma. (as in: 'Do you understand what I'm saying?')

I've lived in a number of other English counties but don't recall any having the colour and variety of Cumbria speak.

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Just now, Hopping Mad said:

I lived only five years in Cumbria, Paul.

Yan was in common use. Yance, as well. "Ah've bin ti Barra yance."

Other expressions used I hadn't heard before:

Tangles or lugs in hair were 'cotters'.

A clothes horse was, in fact, a clothes 'maiden'.

Somebody fooled or duped into accepting something had been 'codded'.

A bloke was often described as 'laddo', a woman 'lasso'.

'Ooz things?' was a conversation starter.

'Eh' punctuated speech as if it were a comma.

I've lived in a number of other English counties but don't recall any having the colour and variety of Cumbria speak.

 

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1 hour ago, shaun mc said:

Town still do their bit from time to time

 

Screenshot 2021-05-08 080241.jpg

My wife is from the posh bit of Surrey. She's having a go at reading this aloud. 

There's just no way! 🙂

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16 hours ago, Mr Frisky said:

Yan is commonly used in West Cumbria to this day.

Ya is sometimes used instead of Yan

e.g I've 'ad ya covid jab

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13 hours ago, Cumbrian Fanatic said:

Quite a few of these are still in common use depending on where you go in West Cumbria

https://www.lowneststudios.co.uk/cumbrian-dialect/

Allot of those words are common Yorkshire words as well, suspect most date back to the Danelaw and are of nordic decent. The whole if the north if England has strong Dane origins in words and place names

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6 minutes ago, Live after death said:

Allot of those words are common Yorkshire words as well, suspect most date back to the Danelaw and are of nordic decent. The whole if the north if England has strong Dane origins in words and place names

I believe you are correct, as I understand it, other common place or feature names such as beck, fell or thwaite also have Scandinavian origins.

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6 minutes ago, Mr Frisky said:

Yan is one

Ya is you or your

As someone pointed out earlier in the thread, there are still differences within West Cumbria. Ya as in one was commonly used by my grandad, as well as yan

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49 minutes ago, Hopping Mad said:

 

My grandma  (from Lancashire/Cheshire) said 'maiden' rather than clothes horse, and I think being codded is/was a fairly widely used bit of slang - certainly my kids (grown up in Cambs) knew what it meant, and it's in books from 17th century onwards.

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1 hour ago, Hopping Mad said:

I lived only five years in Cumbria, Paul.

Yan was in common use. Yance, as well. "Ah've bin ti Barra yance."

Other expressions used I hadn't heard before:

Tangles or lugs in hair were 'cotters'.

A clothes horse was, in fact, a clothes 'maiden'.

Somebody fooled or duped into accepting something had been 'codded'.

A bloke was often described as 'laddo', a woman 'lasso'.

'Ooz things?' was a conversation starter.

'Eh' punctuated speech as if it were a comma. (as in: 'Do you understand what I'm saying?')

I've lived in a number of other English counties but don't recall any having the colour and variety of Cumbria speak.

Cumbrian born and bred but never heard "codded"

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1 hour ago, Hopping Mad said:

I lived only five years in Cumbria, Paul.

Yan was in common use. Yance, as well. "Ah've bin ti Barra yance."

Other expressions used I hadn't heard before:

Tangles or lugs in hair were 'cotters'.

A clothes horse was, in fact, a clothes 'maiden'.

Somebody fooled or duped into accepting something had been 'codded'.

A bloke was often described as 'laddo', a woman 'lasso'.

'Ooz things?' was a conversation starter.

'Eh' punctuated speech as if it were a comma. (as in: 'Do you understand what I'm saying?')

I've lived in a number of other English counties but don't recall any having the colour and variety of Cumbria speak.

Really interesting I live in a village in Kent and there are quite a few pikie words still used by some around the village in the pub.

There are some other really interesting groups in the UK like the Kale (Welsh Roma speaking Welsh Kala) today its a mixture of Welsh/English and Kala what a mixture:)

 

Paul

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1 hour ago, Hopping Mad said:

My wife is from the posh bit of Surrey. She's having a go at reading this aloud. 

There's just no way! 🙂

My wife is from Moscow I will have a go later on today once she has consumed a few glasses of wine LOL:)

 

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3 hours ago, Live after death said:

Allot of those words are common Yorkshire words as well, suspect most date back to the Danelaw and are of nordic decent. The whole if the north if England has strong Dane origins in words and place names

Yes, the dialect mentioned above, really with the exception of the numbers, is not connected to the dead language.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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