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3 hours ago, Robin Evans said:

I remember going to a British shop at Steveston. It had all matter of supermarket stuff and a full range of frozen pies n mushy peyzūü§£

There's probably something wrong with being quite so excited about Monster Munch, a Fray Bentos Steak and Mushroom pie and a beef and tomato Pot Noodle. And those things¬†surely don't taste as good sober.¬†¬†ūü§£

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A new British shop opened in town (take that COVID! LOL), was in there with a mate the other week.  "WTF is a spotted d!ck?!" "Usually comes after a Manchester Tart."

Potted meat sandwiches.

You could well be right, Futtocks.  I imagine the reality is that most civilizations learn to (a) use the off-cuts of, and offal from, cooked meat carcasses, rather than waste them, and (b) to extend

6 hours ago, shaun mc said:

Also black pudding in Spain and on the Canaries

The Spanish versions of black pudding (morcilla), are worth trying if you enjoy the British product. I particularly like the version with rice in the mix, as it gives you more texture than some of the others.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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8 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

The Spanish versions of black pudding (morcilla), are worth trying if you enjoy the British product. I particularly like the version with rice in the mix, as it gives you more texture than some of the others.

The one I had on Lanzarote was closer to a blood sausage, if I remember, no rice. Restaurant up in the mountains. I ordered it as a starter. 3 pieces of it arrived - struggled with a main course

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13 minutes ago, shaun mc said:

The one I had on Lanzarote was closer to a blood sausage, if I remember, no rice. Restaurant up in the mountains. I ordered it as a starter. 3 pieces of it arrived - struggled with a main course

There are various and quite different types of morcilla, which can come as a shock if you've had one and assumed they were all the same. Some are strongly spiced, some mildly, some have onions in them, some have rice, some are thin, some are fat, etc.

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"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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21 hours ago, Leeds Wire said:

I read somewhere that Cornish pasties as we know them actually originated in Cumbria. Annoyingly, I can't find the link.

Originally called "Cumberland miners' pasties", they were half-savoury, half-sweet, and according to some food historians, predate the Cornish version - and also taste better.  Made to an ancient recipe used by the wives of miners in Borrowdale, one end is filled with mince, vegetables and potatoes and the other with stewed apples or plums for the pudding.

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Jam Eater  1.(noun. jam eeter) A Resident of Whitehaven or Workington. Offensive.  It is now a term of abuse that both towns of West Cumbria use for each other especially at Workington/Whitehaven rugby league derby matches.

St Albans Centurions Website 

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The hot cross bun originated in England, and should be called the St Albans bun.

'It is said that the St Alban Bun, the precursor to the famous Hot Cross Bun, originates in St Albans where Brother Thomas Rocliffe, a 14th Century Monk at St Albans Abbey, developed an original recipe. From 1361, Brother Thomas would distribute these buns to feed the poor on Good Friday.  The abbey bakers, who still bake the buns today, stay faithful to the original 14th century recipe with only a slight addition of some extra fruit. The buns are distinctive in their appearance due to their lack of a piped cross. Instead, the baker cuts the cross into the top of the bun with a knife.'

Jam Eater  1.(noun. jam eeter) A Resident of Whitehaven or Workington. Offensive.  It is now a term of abuse that both towns of West Cumbria use for each other especially at Workington/Whitehaven rugby league derby matches.

St Albans Centurions Website 

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4 hours ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

A couple of days ago Papa's fish and chips in Hull were doing deep-fried Colin the Caterpillars. 

strewth, one of them must soak up half a gallon of cooking oil

Wibble

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1 hour ago, CanaBull said:

There's probably something wrong with being quite so excited about Monster Munch, a Fray Bentos Steak and Mushroom pie and a beef and tomato Pot Noodle. And those things¬†surely don't taste as good sober.¬†¬†ūü§£

I can just see a fray bentos pie, with a pot noodle dumped on top and a garnish of monster munch all on one plate, a proper 2am drunken supper

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Wibble

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7 minutes ago, voteronniegibbs said:

I can just see a fray bentos pie, with a pot noodle dumped on top and a garnish of monster munch all on one plate, a proper 2am drunken supper

Oh FFS, hold my beer.¬†ūü§£ūüėČ

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33 minutes ago, voteronniegibbs said:

I can just see a fray bentos pie, with a pot noodle dumped on top and a garnish of monster munch all on one plate, a proper 2am drunken supper

Got to be Pickled Onion monster munch though. 

I’m not prejudiced, I hate everybody equally

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2 hours ago, Exiled Townie said:

Originally called "Cumberland miners' pasties", they were half-savoury, half-sweet, and according to some food historians, predate the Cornish version - and also taste better.  Made to an ancient recipe used by the wives of miners in Borrowdale, one end is filled with mince, vegetables and potatoes and the other with stewed apples or plums for the pudding.

In other parts of the country such as Bedfordshire and neighbouring counties, pasties with separate savoury and sweet ends were known as "clangers". 

Insert lame Soup Dragon joke here.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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Trotters, anyone mentioned them yet?

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Radio 5 Live: Saturday 14 April 2007

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This country's wealth was created by men in overalls, it was destroyed by men in suits.

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2 hours ago, Padge said:

Trotters, anyone mentioned them yet?

Depends how it is cooked - plenty of traditional French, German, Chinese, Italian recipes for trotter.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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4 hours ago, hindle xiii said:

How about pork scratchings?!

Chicharrones in Mexico, Pork Rinds in the USA.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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Food is not really national that much, despite the best efforts of the C19th.

Scouse in Hamburg looks different to Liverpool but tastes the same. In Denmark it looks the same as Liverpool, but has pretty much no flavour (as the Danes prefer much of their food).

Yorkshire puddings are known as Dutch to the Americans, but are clearly a roasts rather than fried pan cake. Even faggots are pretty similar to frikadeller.

Pork scratchings are found in Denmark as Flaeskesvaer (again with the flavour removed).

"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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Used to be a Hungarian place we'd go to here that had toportyu, cubes of fried pork belly fat.  Sure, you could feel your arteries hardening as you ate it, but it was soooo good.

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Pork Pie?

Incidentally I had a Mark's & Spencer's Melton Mowbray pork pie from their " Our Best Ever " range yesterday. It was excellent.

Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

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15 minutes ago, Bearman said:

Pork Pie?

Incidentally I had a Mark's & Spencer's Melton Mowbray pork pie from their " Our Best Ever " range yesterday. It was excellent.

The steak pie from the same range is a fine thing, and generously-sized too. I haven't had one since before lockdown, and now I really want one.

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"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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