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Newcastle Thunder Community Department set for expansion


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The development of rugby league in the region will expand significantly in 2021 as the award winning Newcastle Rugby Foundation announce exciting expansion plans to the Newcastle Thunder community department.

With the sport in the north east seeing a 40% growth in participation over the past five years, the addition of three new members of staff will see the foundation’s programmes result in more players than ever before participate in the game.

Over 1300 players are currently registered at the 15 community rugby league clubs in the region, with growth of school teams, community club’s or variants such as touch, PDRL/LDRL or wheelchair rugby being targeted by the new look community team.

There will be a focus on club development in the North of Tyne, South of Tyne and Tees Valley, in order to create new participation opportunities and on school engagement via the Sky Try and Thunder School Connections programmes.

In addition to building up the RLWC 2021, which will see five games in the men’s competition held in the north east and the Foundation aim to engage new audiences, there will also be a focus on those who have been involved in the game’s past via a North East Rugby League heritage programme.

Alongside, Thunder’s coaching camp programme will be expanded with dates set to be hosted both at Kingston Park and community clubs every school holiday while enhanced pre-match activation at home Championship and cup matches will serve to make big games, bigger.

The Foundation on will also be launching new programmes to engage the north east community by using rugby league as a vehicle to improve mental and physical well-being

In order to develop and deliver these exciting programmes the Foundation will welcome Steve Beaty as Newcastle Thunder Community Manager, with Danny Gilroy and Joe Eltringham joining as Community Development Officers 

The trio will join Jason Grant who is currently leading efforts as the CDO in Tees Valley.

Over the forthcoming weeks and months further details on each of the Foundation’s programmes will be confirmed along with introductions to the members of the team and information on how to become involved.

Chair of Newcastle Rugby Foundation Mick Hogan said: “This is a really exciting development for rugby league in the north east, particularly with the Rugby League World Cup kicking off in Newcastle this October.

“We are building on the success of our development programme and the creation of new clubs like Newcastle Magpies and Wallsend Centurions is a real positive, particularly in the areas where there traditionally hasn’t been rugby league activity. 

“The diversity of our rugby league offer will emphasise that it is a sport for everyone from pre-school tots to over 35s masters, women and girls, touch rugby and the various forms of disability rugby league.

“Accessibility and inclusivity will remain at the heart of everything we do. The Foundation, along with our partners, are driving up the numbers of young people playing the game in schools. It is important we transition these new players into clubs all across the region which will ultimately result in a stronger Newcastle Thunder.”

Jan Robinson – Chair of NERL said: “2020 was a difficult year for everyone and as we return to a ‘new normal’ in 2021 we have much to look forward to in the north east, not only in terms of a playing season, but also our local team in the Championship, and the Rugby League World Cup with significant games in our area. 

“It is very pleasing to see that the Foundation will be there to support and develop Rugby League in the North East as we aim to ‘Build Back Better’.”

To get in touch for more information on the Newcastle Thunder Community please contact steve.beaty@newcastle-thunder.co.uk

 

 

https://www.thunderrugby.co.uk/general/foundation-expands-rugby-league-activities/

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The development of rugby league in the region will expand significantly in 2021 as the award winning Newcastle Rugby Foundation announce exciting expansion plans to the Newcastle Thunder community dep

That’s because it’s not the rival code    our foundations goals are to grow rugby of both codes, there’s no rivalry up here, both working together to help each other grow. All being wel

The Newcastle Thunder continue to embarrass a lot of so called heartland clubs with their ambition

9 minutes ago, Newcastle Thunder said:

 

The development of rugby league in the region will expand significantly in 2021 as the award winning Newcastle Rugby Foundation announce exciting expansion plans to the Newcastle Thunder community department.

With the sport in the north east seeing a 40% growth in participation over the past five years, the addition of three new members of staff will see the foundation’s programmes result in more players than ever before participate in the game.

Over 1300 players are currently registered at the 15 community rugby league clubs in the region, with growth of school teams, community club’s or variants such as touch, PDRL/LDRL or wheelchair rugby being targeted by the new look community team.

There will be a focus on club development in the North of Tyne, South of Tyne and Tees Valley, in order to create new participation opportunities and on school engagement via the Sky Try and Thunder School Connections programmes.

In addition to building up the RLWC 2021, which will see five games in the men’s competition held in the north east and the Foundation aim to engage new audiences, there will also be a focus on those who have been involved in the game’s past via a North East Rugby League heritage programme.

Alongside, Thunder’s coaching camp programme will be expanded with dates set to be hosted both at Kingston Park and community clubs every school holiday while enhanced pre-match activation at home Championship and cup matches will serve to make big games, bigger.

The Foundation on will also be launching new programmes to engage the north east community by using rugby league as a vehicle to improve mental and physical well-being

In order to develop and deliver these exciting programmes the Foundation will welcome Steve Beaty as Newcastle Thunder Community Manager, with Danny Gilroy and Joe Eltringham joining as Community Development Officers 

The trio will join Jason Grant who is currently leading efforts as the CDO in Tees Valley.

Over the forthcoming weeks and months further details on each of the Foundation’s programmes will be confirmed along with introductions to the members of the team and information on how to become involved.

Chair of Newcastle Rugby Foundation Mick Hogan said: “This is a really exciting development for rugby league in the north east, particularly with the Rugby League World Cup kicking off in Newcastle this October.

“We are building on the success of our development programme and the creation of new clubs like Newcastle Magpies and Wallsend Centurions is a real positive, particularly in the areas where there traditionally hasn’t been rugby league activity. 

“The diversity of our rugby league offer will emphasise that it is a sport for everyone from pre-school tots to over 35s masters, women and girls, touch rugby and the various forms of disability rugby league.

“Accessibility and inclusivity will remain at the heart of everything we do. The Foundation, along with our partners, are driving up the numbers of young people playing the game in schools. It is important we transition these new players into clubs all across the region which will ultimately result in a stronger Newcastle Thunder.”

Jan Robinson – Chair of NERL said: “2020 was a difficult year for everyone and as we return to a ‘new normal’ in 2021 we have much to look forward to in the north east, not only in terms of a playing season, but also our local team in the Championship, and the Rugby League World Cup with significant games in our area. 

“It is very pleasing to see that the Foundation will be there to support and develop Rugby League in the North East as we aim to ‘Build Back Better’.”

To get in touch for more information on the Newcastle Thunder Community please contact steve.beaty@newcastle-thunder.co.uk

 

 

https://www.thunderrugby.co.uk/general/foundation-expands-rugby-league-activities/

The Newcastle Thunder continue to embarrass a lot of so called heartland clubs with their ambition

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Absolutely fantastic news once again. As I have often said Newcastle should be the blueprint for every lower league club. No excuse, they just get on and do it with a great plan and growth bit by bit. Great stuff.

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Great,positive news for the game in the North East,maybe the RFL/clubs should take note and act upon the initiatives the Thunder are undertaking.

And to think some would have you believe that central funding below Superleague is just “wasted”

Edited by Davo5
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Congratulations to Newcastle for once again, expanding their development ambitions.

It's such a shame, when our heartland areas speak of ''saturation'' or ''no interest'' in their localities. 

If you calculate the ratio of number of participants to number of population (of playing age), even in our heartland areas then the ratio is vanishingly small. I believe the potential for Rugby League development exists everywhere (because it's a great game) but you have to get ''out there'' and provide the guidance for people to get involved and self-organise. 

Newcastle are a beacon, showing all the nay-sayers what can be done, with the will to do it.

Come on RL, model what's going on up there, so others can use the model to replicate Newcastle's success.

If this programme existed everywhere there's an amateur presence now, just imagine what the game would look like in 20 years time, or 40.

Exponential growth is a truly amazing phenomenon.

No more worries about filling Wembley, no more shortage of sponsors, no more lack of pro players, no more getting our backsides kicked by Southern Hemisphere sides, no more shabby grounds ............. etc.etc. 

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It is marvellous news and evidence that RL can be introduced and thrive anywhere. However, without the professional development team how much would be long lasting?

When the SE funding was cut and therefore the DOs how many of the spectacular gains were maintained?

Where do Newcastle get the funding from to support the development team? If it's from the club's owner it's highly unlikely that this is a reproducible model knowing that most of the current top line clubs lose money. 

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5 minutes ago, PaulF said:

It is marvellous news and evidence that RL can be introduced and thrive anywhere

I think what it is evidence of is that Rugby League is best served concentrating resources and expanding into areas that adjoin regions where the game is already established. In trying to break into areas where there is no nearby existing activity to tap into, it often seems too difficult to establish a critical number of clubs or teams.

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1 hour ago, cookey said:

Congratulations.

As everyone seems to agree,quite why Newcastle are not the blueprint for other clubs is beyond me.

Newcastle are doing brilliant work and they are one of the Championship clubs I’m going to be rooting for. But the fact is a lot of money is been put into both the team and the grassroots in the local area. With investment Rugby League can be a success anywhere, we just need multimillionaires to be running every club and them willing to put their money into the club and local area.

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19 minutes ago, Sir Kevin Sinfield said:

Newcastle are doing brilliant work and they are one of the Championship clubs I’m going to be rooting for. But the fact is a lot of money is been put into both the team and the grassroots in the local area. With investment Rugby League can be a success anywhere, we just need multimillionaires to be running every club and them willing to put their money into the club and local area.

£2,7 million has been withheld from the last 2 clubs entering Superleague,that would have gone a long way to fund grassroots development.

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57 minutes ago, PaulF said:

It is marvellous news and evidence that RL can be introduced and thrive anywhere. However, without the professional development team how much would be long lasting?

When the SE funding was cut and therefore the DOs how many of the spectacular gains were maintained?

Where do Newcastle get the funding from to support the development team? If it's from the club's owner it's highly unlikely that this is a reproducible model knowing that most of the current top line clubs lose money. 

They could always refrain from bringing in an over the hill NRL player and spend that on a development team.

Edited by Davo5
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It’s great news. The development of the game in the North East has been nothing short of phenomenal and the way it’s been driven by Newcastle Thunder has been great to see. Long may it continue. 

With Magic, the World Cup and Thunder, we have a springboard to really push on in that part of the world. 

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4 hours ago, Newcastle Thunder said:

 

The development of rugby league in the region will expand significantly in 2021 as the award winning Newcastle Rugby Foundation announce exciting expansion plans to the Newcastle Thunder community department.

With the sport in the north east seeing a 40% growth in participation over the past five years, the addition of three new members of staff will see the foundation’s programmes result in more players than ever before participate in the game.

Over 1300 players are currently registered at the 15 community rugby league clubs in the region, with growth of school teams, community club’s or variants such as touch, PDRL/LDRL or wheelchair rugby being targeted by the new look community team.

There will be a focus on club development in the North of Tyne, South of Tyne and Tees Valley, in order to create new participation opportunities and on school engagement via the Sky Try and Thunder School Connections programmes.

In addition to building up the RLWC 2021, which will see five games in the men’s competition held in the north east and the Foundation aim to engage new audiences, there will also be a focus on those who have been involved in the game’s past via a North East Rugby League heritage programme.

Alongside, Thunder’s coaching camp programme will be expanded with dates set to be hosted both at Kingston Park and community clubs every school holiday while enhanced pre-match activation at home Championship and cup matches will serve to make big games, bigger.

The Foundation on will also be launching new programmes to engage the north east community by using rugby league as a vehicle to improve mental and physical well-being

In order to develop and deliver these exciting programmes the Foundation will welcome Steve Beaty as Newcastle Thunder Community Manager, with Danny Gilroy and Joe Eltringham joining as Community Development Officers 

The trio will join Jason Grant who is currently leading efforts as the CDO in Tees Valley.

Over the forthcoming weeks and months further details on each of the Foundation’s programmes will be confirmed along with introductions to the members of the team and information on how to become involved.

Chair of Newcastle Rugby Foundation Mick Hogan said: “This is a really exciting development for rugby league in the north east, particularly with the Rugby League World Cup kicking off in Newcastle this October.

“We are building on the success of our development programme and the creation of new clubs like Newcastle Magpies and Wallsend Centurions is a real positive, particularly in the areas where there traditionally hasn’t been rugby league activity. 

“The diversity of our rugby league offer will emphasise that it is a sport for everyone from pre-school tots to over 35s masters, women and girls, touch rugby and the various forms of disability rugby league.

“Accessibility and inclusivity will remain at the heart of everything we do. The Foundation, along with our partners, are driving up the numbers of young people playing the game in schools. It is important we transition these new players into clubs all across the region which will ultimately result in a stronger Newcastle Thunder.”

Jan Robinson – Chair of NERL said: “2020 was a difficult year for everyone and as we return to a ‘new normal’ in 2021 we have much to look forward to in the north east, not only in terms of a playing season, but also our local team in the Championship, and the Rugby League World Cup with significant games in our area. 

“It is very pleasing to see that the Foundation will be there to support and develop Rugby League in the North East as we aim to ‘Build Back Better’.”

To get in touch for more information on the Newcastle Thunder Community please contact steve.beaty@newcastle-thunder.co.uk

 

 

https://www.thunderrugby.co.uk/general/foundation-expands-rugby-league-activities/

If ever a club is destined for superleague it is Newcastle. 

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11 hours ago, Sir Kevin Sinfield said:

Newcastle are doing brilliant work and they are one of the Championship clubs I’m going to be rooting for. But the fact is a lot of money is been put into both the team and the grassroots in the local area. With investment Rugby League can be a success anywhere, we just need multimillionaires to be running every club and them willing to put their money into the club and local area.

No doubt a committed benefactor can make this happen but I'm arguing that we shouldn't be waiting for a Millionaire to come along and do it for us.

That attitude has held the game back for years.

I'm proposing (asking) that the RL provide a ''how to'' guide so that anyone who wants to get involved in development will have a model of excellence to follow.

I believe that the most obvious target group, for this kind of initiative is the amateur league administrations.

First of all, let's agree, if we're not growing the game, its only a matter of time before the game declines. So whatever else we do, we have to make time and set aside some energy to grow the game.

Next, stop waiting for someone to come and do it for us.

Look for examples of best practise and copy them (hence the need for the ''how to'' guide).

Measure the outcomes, the results of your efforts and celebrate when growth is demonstrated. 

Edited by fighting irish
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43 minutes ago, Cumbrian Mackem said:

Well done Newcastle thunder 👍

That must have hurt 😂. If Ipswich RL started up and introduced 20 thriving Community Clubs around Suffolk I’d still find something about it to deride. 

Edited by Eddie
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  Newcastle doing things the right way.Growing from bottom up with firm foundations.Its OK throwing money at getting into S.L. and using  players other clubs can't afford or deemed too old just after a last payday.But when the money runs out you are in the brown sticky stuff.Well done Newcastle.

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1 hour ago, GUBRATS said:

Does anybody know where the funding is from ?

Same owners (and home ground) as Newcastle Falcons RUFC.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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15 hours ago, Davo5 said:

They could always refrain from bringing in an over the hill NRL player and spend that on a development team.

One thing I have wondered for a while, when clubs bring in veteran Antipodeans is it ever written into contracts that they are required to do a certain number of hours development work in the community? The reason I ask is that a couple of my eldest sons former team mates (yes I know it’s gridiron but there are parallels) landed contracts to play gridiron in Europe, the pay is pretty paltry, the attractiveness is the chance to see a bit of Europe for a couple of years before joining the rest of us in work drudgery, however their contracts require them to spend a set number of hours coaching young players. Now if that is the case with imports to SL then fine, as long as those commitments are honoured, however if all they do is fulfill their role as an on field player then I think we are missing something here. These guys should be getting wheeled out to local amateur clubs, speaking at fundraisers and building links with the community.

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