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Garbage

From that Gayle/Connor montage they did pre game on Friday I realise I quite like it. Heard a few other RL people use it too (Schoey etc)

Obviously it will annoy some people as an Americanism and that appeals to me.

Might start integrating it into my everyday useage

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1. Ornery.

It was used where I lived in rural US, for example “he’s as ornery as a moose”.

Nobody, and I mean nobody, uses the word “ornery” in Australia so I started using it here.

2. Writing “gaol” instead of “jail”.

 

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I once worked in Accrington for six months.

 

Bottle = Bockle

Kettle = Keckle

To be honest, I found it funny and not remotely annoying.

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Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police

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There's a few dialect words that seem to raise a smile.

Chelpin', laikin', slahtin'.

And there's one my Grandad used that you don't hear often any more, bummerskite.

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Freedom 

Orchestra

Sunshine

Grossglockner 

Soccer 

City 

Lancashire

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm interested in that drive, that rush to judgment, that is so prevalent in our society. We all know that pleasurable rush that comes from condemning, and in the short term it's quite a satisfying thing to do, isn't it?

J. K. Rowling

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I know I'm in a Scot's company when 'internationalist' is trotted out.

Ditto 'outwith'.

Both good to hear.

'Lugubrious' does it for me, too.

Ditto 'North Utsire' and 'South Utsire'.

Edited by Hopping Mad
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3 hours ago, Hopping Mad said:

I know I'm in a Scot's company when 'internationalist' is trotted out.

Ditto 'outwith'.

Both good to hear.

'Lugubrious' does it for me, too.

Ditto 'North Utsire' and 'South Utsire'.

Being a Scot, I too like 'outwith' and it seems to me to make more sense than the equivalent, if anachronistic, English version - 'without'; at least the latter has been rendered virtually redundant by use of 'outside'.  However, as a kid, I could not understand the opening hymn line, "There is a green hill far away without a city wall".  I kept thinking that it was odd to make a point of mentioning that this green hill had no city wall, because why would a green hill have one in any case?

Still on the Scottish theme, I like 'thereby' meaning 'about'.  So, information on land for sale might say, 'the plot extends to two acres or thereby'.

For its lovely sound, my favourite word is 'crepuscular', as in, for instance, 'the nightjar is a bird which is most active in the crepuscular period of each day.'

Shetland, from which my dad's side of the family come, has a very rich vocabulary, not least for all of the local wildlife.  Examples include dratsie (otter), bonxie (great skua), aalin (Arctic skua), tammie norrie (puffin), shalder (oystercatcher) and tystie (black guillemot)

In Northumberland, eider ducks are called 'cuddy ducks', which I believe really means St Cuthbert's ducks.  St Cuthbert would certainly have come close to these sea ducks in that county.

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6 hours ago, Robthegasman said:

I like the C word.It describes a lot of people perfectly especially some of those who write venom in the Political Discussion forum🤣🤣

Conservative? 😆😉

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1 hour ago, CanaBull said:

Conservative? 😆😉

No. Canadian. 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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I'm interested in that drive, that rush to judgment, that is so prevalent in our society. We all know that pleasurable rush that comes from condemning, and in the short term it's quite a satisfying thing to do, isn't it?

J. K. Rowling

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On 14/03/2022 at 07:22, Robin Evans said:

And it was never a word used in a profane way.

Totally agree. Is this a 5 towns verb? Haven't heard anywhere else. Akin to faffing.  "Stop faffing and gerritdun." Agree f anny was never used in a derogative fashion. 

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Will, and Smith.

I'm interested in that drive, that rush to judgment, that is so prevalent in our society. We all know that pleasurable rush that comes from condemning, and in the short term it's quite a satisfying thing to do, isn't it?

J. K. Rowling

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