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Rob Burrow: Living With MND Documentary


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7 hours ago, Gay pride said:

Yes I believe its a new documentary and a follow up to the previous documentary.

The original 2020 documentary was called "My Year with MND".

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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11 minutes ago, Chrispmartha said:

New documentary on BBC2 now.

It’s utterly heartbreaking but very powerful 

The unnecessary scheduling clash means I'll watch it on catch-up, if I can bring myself to.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Whenever I see Rob now I can’t help but see the amazing athlete he was not so long ago. It’s shocking how fast he’s gone from those images in my head of him stepping through defences or pulling off a tackle to the frail, dependent person sat in his chair. 
 

One match always comes to mind and it’s the World Club Challenge game Vs Manly at Elland Road. He was hit by Anthony Watmough and carried off very badly concussed. I have to wonder if that was the time, was that the catalyst that began it all?

He has an amazing family around him, his wife is an absolute angel, his children are amazing and his parents too. While some of his friends and ex team mates like Kevin Sinfield and Barry McDermott etc can’t do enough for him

Its tragic but he continues to be inspiring

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What a bloke and what a family, although through all this adversity just like a player he will not give in and perhaps through all this he maintains his dignity and wicked sense of humour that was a golden thread through his book. Hats off to you lad and those around you.

Although a rival fan over the years I have to say that Kevin Sinfield really is a true leader with his support for Rob and his family, friendship like that is priceless.

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I've been advised by the missus not to watch it (I lost my dad to MND), but it always strikes me that Rob was something almost unique in the modern game: a player who was liked by almost everyone even opposition fans. Maybe I have rose-tinted spectacles but I genuinely don't remember him being disliked by anyone.

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45 minutes ago, Maximus Decimus said:

I've been advised by the missus not to watch it (I lost my dad to MND), but it always strikes me that Rob was something almost unique in the modern game: a player who was liked by almost everyone even opposition fans. Maybe I have rose-tinted spectacles but I genuinely don't remember him being disliked by anyone.

Nope I think it's true to say that. 

I'm currently suffering with a bad back and am in pain 24/7. But Rob makes me ashamed of moaning about it, utterly inspirational and a totally selfless person. 

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Take it Off! Take it Off! 

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Hard watch, but the women in his life are strong. Rob's dad could hardly cope far more emotional than his wife. Maybe it says much about Northern women.

it's great they recorded his voice and he can still make jokes with even the worst subject under discussion (end of life care)

 

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  • 1 month later...

Just seen this.

“Former Rugby League player Rob Burrow is set to read the CBeebies Bedtime Story on the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

Rob, who used to play for Leeds Rhinos, lives with motor neurone disease (MND) and will be using an eye-controlled computer to read the story.

The computer recreates the words in his own native Yorkshire accent.

Rob says he is "excited and honoured" as he used to enjoy reading to his own children.

He was joined in the CBeebies studio by his wife Lindsey and two of their children, Maya, 7, and Jackson, 3.

The pair helped to direct their dad from the gallery, shouting "Action!" when the cameras began rolling.

He told the BBC: "Reading and literacy are so important. It doesn't matter what your disability is, reading is accessible to everyone. 

"Anyone can enjoy reading and develop a love of books and bedtime stories, just like me and my family."

The book chosen for his bedtime story is Tilda Tries Again by Tom Percival.

It follows the story of a young girl who one day finds her world turned upside-down and has to find a new way to solve her problems.”

Just wonderful!

 

 

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